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Amana instructions 80% model

Whirlpool 90+ GAS FURNACE INSTALLATION

 

Amana  Furnace installation instructions two stage variable speed 80 %

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Amana Furnace installation instructions two stage variable speed 80 %

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C om fo r t. Q u ality. Tr u st.

Part No. 10759833

 

Two-Stage Variable Speed

Gas-Fired Furnace

Installation Instructions

 

 

This Forced Air Central Furnace design complies with require-

ments embodied in

The American National Standard / National Standard of Canada

shown below:

 

ANSI Z21.47•CSA-2.3 Gas Fired Central Furnaces

 

C E RT I F I E D

 

Goodman Company, L.P.

 

Printed in USA

 

1810 Wilson Parkway • Fayetteville, Tennessee 37334

www.amana-hac.com

 

February 2003

 

Table of Contents

 

Safety Instructions …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4

Recognize Safety Symbols, Words, and Labels ……………………………………………………………………………………… 4

General Information ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6

Shipping and Handling …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6

Product Application ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6

Location Requirements and Considerations ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8

Existing Furnace Removal ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9

Thermostat Requirements …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9

Thermostat Location ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9

Combustion and Ventilation Air Requirements ………………………………………………………………. 10

Category I Venting (Vertical Venting) ……………………………………………………………………………… 13

Electrical Connections ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16

Wiring Harness ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16

115 Volt Line Connections ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16

Junction Box Relocation …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16

Gas Supply and Piping …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 19

Proper Piping Practice ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19

High Altitude Derate …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 20

Gas Piping Connections …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 20

Inlet Piping…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 21

Gas Piping Checks …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 22

Propane Gas and/or High Altitude Installations ……………………………………………………………… 23

Propane Gas Tanks and Piping ……………………………………………………………………………………… 23

Circulating Air and Filters ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 25

Ductwork Sizing …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 25

Filters ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 25

Upright Installations …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 25

Horizontal Installations ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 25

 

 

 

TO THE INSTALLER

Before installing this unit please read this manual and the Specification Sheet to

familiarize yourself on the specific items which must be adhered to such as

maximum external static pressure to unit, air temperature rise, minimum or

maximum CFM and motor speed connections.

 

TO THE OWNER

Your warranty certificate is also supplied with the unit. Read the warranty carefully

and note what is covered. Keep the warranty certificate in a safe location for future

reference.

If additional information or operating instructions are required, contact the dealer

where the purchase was made.

If the residence is left unattended for an extended period of time (i.e., 4 hours or

greater), have your heating system periodically checked to ensure proper

operation. Potential circumstances beyond our control such as power outages,

gas service interruptions, product installation, or component failures could result

in heating system operational problems.

 

 

2

 

Table of Contents

 

Startup Adjustments and Measurements ……………………………………………………………………….. 26

Furnace Operation ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 26

Measure Gas Supply Pressure ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 27

Measure and Adjust Gas Manifold Pressure ………………………………………………………………………………………… 27

Measure Natural Gas Input Rate………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 28

Measure and Adjust Temperature Rise ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 28

Operational Checks ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 29

Burner Flame ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 29

Auxiliary Limit ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 29

High or Primary Limit …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 30

Safety Circuit Description …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 31

Integrated Ignition Control ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 31

Primary Limit ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 31

Auxiliary Limit ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 31

Rollout Limit ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 31

Pressure Switches ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 31

Flame Sensor …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 31

Burner Box ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 31

Troubleshooting …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 32

Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Precautions ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 32

Furnace Lockout ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 32

Diagnostic Chart ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 32

Maintenance…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 35

Filters ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 35

Burners ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 37

Induced Draft and Circulator Blowers ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 37

Qualified Servicer Only ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 37

Before Leaving an Installation ………………………………………………………………………………………. 38

Repair and Replacement Parts ………………………………………………………………………………………. 38

3

 

Safety Instructions

 

Recognize Safety Symbols, Words, and Labels

 

Please adhere to the following warnings and cautions when installing, adjusting, altering, servicing, or operating the

furnace. Failure to heed safety information increases the risk of personal injury, property damage, and/or product

damage.

 

WARNING

 

If the information in these instructions is not followed exactly, fire or explosion may result

causing property damage, personal injury or loss of life.

 

• Do not store or use gasoline or other flammable vapors and liquids in the

vicinity of this or any other appliance.

• What to do if you smell gas:

• Do not try to light any appliance.

• Do not touch any electrical switch; do not use any phone in your

building.

• Immediately call your gas supplier from a neighbor’s phone. Follow

the gas supplier’s instructions.

• If you cannot reach your gas supplier, call the fire department.

• Installation and service must be performed by a qualified installer,

service agency or the gas supplier.

 

 

 

WARNING

 

Should overheating occur or the gas supply fail to shut off, turn off the manual gas shut-off

valve external to the furnace before turning off the electrical supply.

 

 

 

WARNING

 

To prevent personal injury or death due to improper installation, adjustment, alteration,

service or maintenance, refer to this manual. For additional assistance or information,

consult a qualified installer, service agency or the gas supplier.

4

 

Safety Instructions

 

 

 

WARNING

 

To prevent possible death or personal injury due to asphyxiation, this Non-Condensing Gas

Fired Warm Air Furnaces must be Category I vented. Do not vent any of these furnaces using

Category III venting.

Provisions must be made for venting combustion products outdoors through a proper

venting system. The length of flue pipe could be a limiting factor in locating the furnace.

 

 

WARNING

 

 

This product contains or produces a chemical or chemicals which may cause serious illness

or death and which are known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects or other

reproductive harm.

 

 

 

WARNING

 

To prevent possible death, personal injury or property damage due to electrical shock, the

furnace must be located to protect the electrical components from water.

 

 

 

CAUTION

 

This unit must not be used as a “construction heater” during the finishing phases of

construction on a new structure. This type of use may result in premature failure of the unit

due to extremely low return air temperatures and exposure to corrosive or very dirty

atmospheres.

 

5

 

General Information

 

Shipping and Handling

 

All units are securely packed in shipping containers tested according to International Safe Transit Association

specifications. The carton must be checked upon arrival for external damage. If damage is found, a request for inspection

by carrier’s agent must be made in writing immediately.

The furnace must be carefully inspected on arrival for damage and bolts or screws which may have come loose in transit.

In the event of damage the consignee should:

1. Make a notation on delivery receipt of any visible damage to shipment or container.

2. Notify carrier promptly and request an inspection.

3. With concealed damage, carrier must be notified as soon as possible – preferably within five days.

4. File the claim with the following support documents within a nine month statute of limitations.

• Original or certified copy of the Bill of Lading, or indemnity bond.

• Original paid freight bill or indemnity in lieu thereof.

• Original or certified copy of the invoice, showing trade and other discounts or reductions.

• Copy of the inspection report issued by carrier’s representative at the time damage is reported to carrier.

The carrier is responsible for making prompt inspection of damage and for a thorough investigation of each claim. The

distributor or manufacturer will not accept claims from dealers for transportation damage.

 

Product Application

 

This furnace is primarily designed for residential home-heating applications. It is NOT designed or certified for use in

mobile homes, trailers or recreational vehicles. Neither is it designed or certified for outdoor applications. The furnace

must be installed indoors (i.e., attic space, crawl space, or garage area provided the garage area is enclosed with an

operating door).

This furnace can be used in the following non-industrial commercial applications:

Schools, Office buildings, Churches, Retail stores

Nursing homes, Hotels/motels, Common or office areas

In such applications , the furnace must be installed with the following stipulations:

• It must be installed per the Installation Instructions provided and per local and national

codes.

• It must be installed indoors in a building constructed on site.

• It must be part of a ducted system and not used in a free air delivery application.

• It must not be used as a “make-up” air unit.

• All other warranty exclusions and restrictions apply. This furnace is an CSA dual-

certified appliance and is appropriate for use with natural or propane gas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

General Information

 

Product Application (cont’d)

 

 

WARNING

 

Possible death, personal injury or property damage due to fire, explosion, smoke, soot, condensation, electrical

shock or carbon monoxide may result from improper installation, repair, operation, or maintenance of this product.

 

 

WARNING

 

To prevent death, personal injury or property damage due to fire, do not install this furnace in a mobile home,

trailer, or recreational vehicle.

 

 

To ensure proper furnace operation, install, operate and maintain this furnace in accordance with these installation and

operation instructions, all local building codes and ordinances. In their absence, follow the latest edition of the National

Fuel Gas Code (NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1), and/or CAN/CSA B149 Installation Codes, local plumbing or waste water codes,

and other applicable codes.

A copy of the National Fuel Gas Code (NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1) can be obtained from any of the following:

American National Standards Institute

1430 Broadway

New York, NY 10018

 

National Fire Protection Association

1 Batterymarch Park

Quincy, MA 02269

 

CSA International

8501 East Pleasant Valley

Cleveland, OH 44131

 

A copy of the CAN/CSA B149 Installation Codes can also be obtained from:

CSA International

178 Rexdale Boulevard

Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada M9W 1R3

The rated heating capacity of the furnace should be greater than or equal to the total heat loss of the area to be heated.

The total heat loss should be calculated by an approved method or in accordance with “ASHRAE Guide” or “Manual J-

Load Calculations” published by the Air Conditioning Contractors of America.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

General Information

 

Location Requirements and Considerations

 

 

 

WARNING

 

To prevent possible death, personal injury, equipment damage, or property damage the following bullet points must

be observed when installing the unit.

Follow the instructions listed below when selecting a furnace location. Refer also to the guidelines provided in the section

Combustion and Ventilation Air Requirements.

 

 

 

• Centrally locate the furnace with respect to the

proposed or existing air distribution system.

• Ensure the temperature of the return air entering the

furnace is between 55°F and 100°F when the fur-

nace is heating.

• Provisions must be made for venting combustion

products outdoors through a proper venting system.

The length of flue pipe could be a limiting factor in

locating the furnace.

• Ensure adequate combustion air is available for the

furnace. Improper or insufficient combustion air can

expose building occupants to gas combustion prod-

ucts that could include carbon monoxide. Refer to

Condensate Drain Lines and Trap for further details.

• The furnace must be level. If the furnace is to be set

on a floor that may become wet or damp at times, the

furnace should be supported above the floor on a

concrete base sized approximately 1-1/2″ larger

than the base of the furnace.

• Ensure upflow or horizontal furnaces are not in-

stalled directly on carpeting, or any other combus-

tible material. The only combustible material al-

lowed is wood.

• Exposure to contaminated combustion air will result

in safety and performance-related problems. Do not

install the furnace where the combustion air is ex-

posed to the following substances:

chlorinated waxes or cleaners

chlorine-based swimming pool chemicals

water softening chemicals

 

 

 

deicing salts or chemicals

carbon tetrachloride

halogen type refrigerants

cleaning solutions (such as perchloroethylene)

printing inks

paint removers

varnishes

hydrochloric acid

cements and glues

antistatic fabric softeners for clothes dryers

and masonry acid washing materials

• If the furnace is used in connection with a cooling

unit, install the furnace upstream or in parallel with

the cooling unit. Premature heat exchanger failure

will result if the cooling unit is placed ahead of the

furnace.

• If the furnace is installed in a residential garage,

position the furnace so that the burners and ignition

source are located not less than 18 inches (457 mm)

above the floor. Protect the furnace from physical

damage by vehicles.

• If the furnace is installed horizontally, the furnace

access doors must be vertical so that the burners fire

horizontally into the heat exchanger. Do not install

the unit with the access doors on the “up/top” or

“down/bottom” side of the furnace.

• Do not connect this furnace to a chimney flue that

serves a separate appliance designed to burn solid

fuel.

 

 

 

 

 

CLEARANCES AND ACCESSIBILITY

Installations must adhere to the clearances to combustible materials

which this furnace has been design certified to.

Allow clearances from the enclosure as shown on Specification Sheet for

fire protection, proper operation, and service access. These clearances

must be permanently maintained. The combustion and ventilating air

openings in the front and top panels of the furnace must never be

obstructed.

 

 

8

 

 

 

FURNACE SUSPENSION

 

General Information

 

If suspending the furnace from rafters or joist, use 3/8″

threaded rod and 2”x2”x1/8” angle iron as shown below.

The length of rod will depend on the application and the

clearances necessary.

PROVIDE 8″ MINMUM CLEARANCE BETWEEN

 

above, return doors, windows, exhaust fans, fireplace dampers

and any other gas burning appliance to their previous conditions

of use;

g. If improper venting is observed during any of the above tests,

the common venting system must be corrected.

 

3/8″ DIAMETER

THREADED ROD

(6 PLACES)

 

HOLD

DOWN

NUTS

 

SUPPORT

NUTS

 

 

 

 

CENTER ROD AND FURNACE CABINET

TO ALLOW FOR CIRCULATOR BLOWER REMOVAL

 

ASSURE FURNACE IS LEVEL FROM

END TO END AND HAS A SLIGHT

OF THE FURNACE 0″-3/4″BELOW

THE BACK OF THE FURNACE

 

 

 

 

 

TILT OUTWARD TO ALLOW

 

Corrections must be in accordance with the latest edition

of the National Fuel Gas Code NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1 and/

or CSA B149 Installation Codes.

If resizing is required on any portion of the venting system,

use the appropriate table in Appendix G in the latest edition

of the National Fuel Gas Code ANSI Z223.1 and/or

CSA B149 Installation Codes.

 

Thermostat Requirements

 

ANGLE IRON

(3 PLACES)

 

POSITION AS CLOSE AS POSSIBLE

TO BLOWER DECK TO ALLOW FOR

CIRCULATOR BLOWER REMVOAL

 

FOR DOOR AND CIRCULATOR

BLOWER REMOVAL

 

The two stage furnace requires a two stage thermostat for

proper operation. A two stage thermostat will have a “W2”

terminal in addition to a “W1” terminal. Refer to Electrical

 

Suspended Furnace

 

Existing Furnace Removal

 

NOTE: When an existing furnace is removed from a

venting system serving other appliances, the venting

system may be too large to properly vent the remaining

attached appliances.

The following vent testing procedure is reproduced from the

American National Standard/National Standard of Canada

for Gas-Fired Central Furnaces ANSI Z21.47-1998,

CSA-2.3-M98 Section 1.23.1.

 

The following steps shall be followed with each appliance connected to

the venting system placed in operation, while any other appliances

connected to the venting system are not in operation:

a. Seal any unused openings in the venting system;

b. Inspect the venting system for proper size and horizontal pitch,

as required by the National Fuel Gas Code, ANSI Z223.1 or the

CSA B149 Installation Codes and these instructions. Determine

that there is no blockage or restriction, leakage, corrosion and

other deficiencies which could cause an unsafe condition;

c. In so far as practical, close all building doors and windows and

all doors between the space in which the appliance(s) connected

to the venting system are located and other spaces of the

 

Connections for proper hookup.

 

Thermostat Location

 

In an area having good air circulation, locate the thermo-

stat about five feet high on a vibration-free inside wall. Do

not install the thermostat where it may be influenced by any

of the following:

• Drafts, or dead spots behind doors, in corners, or

under cabinets.

• Hot or cold air from registers.

• Radiant heat from the sun.

• Light fixtures or other appliances.

• Radiant heat from a fireplace.

• Concealed hot or cold water pipes, or chimneys.

• Unconditioned areas behind the thermostat, such

as an outside wall.

 

building. Turn on clothes dryers and any appliance not con-

nected to the venting system. Turn on any exhaust fans, such as

range hoods and bathroom exhausts, so they shall operate at

maximum speed. Do not operate a summer exhaust fan. Close

fireplace dampers;

d. Follow the lighting instructions. Place the appliance being

inspected in operation. Adjust thermostat so appliance shall

operate continuously;

e. Test for draft hood equipped spillage at the draft hood relief

opening after 5 minutes of main burner operation. Use the flame

 

DRAFTS OR DEAD SPOTS

-BEHIND DOORS

-IN CORNERS

-UNDER CABINETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thermostat Influences

 

HOT

COLD

 

of a match or candle;

f. After it has been determined that each appliance connected to

the venting system properly vents when tested as outlined

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

Consult the instructions packaged with the thermostat for

mounting instructions and further precautions.

 

Combustion and Ventilation Air Requirements

 

 

WARNING

 

Possible death, personal injury or property damage may occur if the furnace is not provided with enough fresh air

for proper combustion and ventilation of flue gases. Most homes require outside air to be supplied to the furnace

area.

 

 

 

 

Improved construction and additional insulation in buildings have reduced heat loss by reducing air filtration and escape

around doors and windows. These changes have helped in reducing heating/cooling costs but have created a problem

supplying combustion and ventilation air for gas fired and other fuel burning appliances. Appliances that pull air out of

the house (clothes dryers, exhaust fans, fireplaces, etc.) increase the problem by starving appliances for air.

House depressurization can cause back drafting or improper combustion of gas-fired appliances, thereby exposing

building occupants to gas combustion products that could include carbon monoxide.

If this furnace is to be installed in the same space with other gas appliances, such as a water heater, ensure there is an

adequate supply of combustion and ventilation air for the other appliances. Refer to the latest edition of the National Fuel

Gas Code NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1 (Section 5.3), or CSA B149 Installation Codes (Sections 7.2, 7.3, or 7.4), or applicable

provisions of the local building codes for determining the combustion air requirements for the appliances.

This furnace must use indoor air for combustion. It cannot be installed as a direct vent (i.e., sealed combustion) furnace.

The burner box is present only to help reduce sound transmission from the burners to the occupied space.

Most homes will require outside air be supplied to the furnace area by means of ventilation grilles or ducts connecting

directly to the outdoors or spaces open to the outdoors such as attics or crawl spaces.

 

 

The following information on air for combustion and ventilation

 

is reproduced from the National Fuel Gas Code

NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1 Section 5.3.

5.3.1 General:

(a) The provisions of 5.3 apply to gas utilization equipment in-

stalled in buildings and which require air for combustion,

ventilation and dilution of flue gases from within the building.

They do not apply to (1) direct vent equipment which is

constructed and installed so that all air combustion is obtained

from the outside atmosphere and all flue gases are discharged to

the outside atmosphere, or (2) enclosed furnaces which incor-

porate an integral total enclosure and use only outside air for

combustion and dilution of flue gases.

(b) Equipment shall be installed in a location in which the facilities

for ventilation permit satisfactory combustion of gas, proper

venting and the maintenance of ambient temperature at safe

limits under normal conditions of use. Equipment shall be

located so as not to interfere with proper circulation of air. When

normal infiltration does not provide the necessary air, outside

air shall be introduced.

(c) In addition to air needed for combustion, process air shall be

provided as required for: cooling of equipment or material,

controlling dew point, heating, drying, oxidation or dilution,

safety exhaust, odor control, and air for compressors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

(d) In addition to air needed for combustion, air shall be supplied for

ventilation, including all air required for comfort and proper

working conditions for personnel.

(e) While all forms of building construction cannot be covered in

detail, air for combustion, ventilation and dilution of flue gases

for gas utilization equipment vented by natural draft normally

may be obtained by application of one of the methods covered

in 5.3.3 and 5.3.4.

(f) Air requirements for the operation of exhaust fans, kitchen

ventilation systems, clothes dryers, and fireplaces shall be

considered in determining the adequacy of a space to provide

combustion air requirements.

5.3.2 Equipment Located in Unconfined Spaces:

In unconfined spaces (see definition below) in buildings, infiltration

may be adequate to provide air for combustion ventilation and

dilution of flue gases. However, in buildings of tight construction

(for example, weather stripping, heavily insulated, caulked, vapor

barrier, etc.), additional air may need to be provided using the

methods described in 5.3.3-b or 5.3.4.

Space, Unconfined.

For purposes of this Code, a space whose volume is not less than 50

cubic feet per 1,000 BTU per hour of the aggregate input rating of

all appliances installed in that space. Rooms communicating di-

rectly with the space in which the appliances are installed through

openings not furnished with doors, are considered a part of the

unconfined space.

 

Combustion and Ventilation Air Requirements

 

5.3.3 Equipment Located in Confined Spaces:

2. When communicating with the outdoors through vertical

 

(a) All Air from Inside the Building: The confined space shall be

provided with two permanent openings communicating directly

with an additional room(s) of sufficient volume so that the

combined volume of all spaces meets the criteria for an uncon-

fined space. The total input of all gas utilization equipment

installed in the combined space shall be considered in making

this determination. Each opening shall have a minimum free area

of 1 square inch per 1,000 BTU per hour of the total input rating

of all gas utilization equipment in the confined space, but not less

than 100 square inches. One opening shall be within 12 inches of

the top and one within 12 inches of the bottom of the enclosure.

Chimney or Gas Vent

NOTE: Each opening must have

a free area of not less than one

square inch per 1000 BTU of

the total input rating of all equip-

 

ducts, each opening shall have a minimum free area of 1

square inch per 4,000 BTU per hour of total input rating of

all equipment in the enclosure.

 

 

Chimney or Gas Vent

Ventilation louvers

(each end of attic)

NOTE: The inlet and outlet air

openings must each have a free

area of not less than one square

inch per 4000 BTU of the

total input rating of all equipment

in the enclosure.

 

Water

 

ment in the enclosure, but not

less than 100 square inches.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water

 

 

 

 

Opening

 

Furnace

 

Heater

 

Inlet air duct

[ends 1 ft (300 mm)

above floor]

 

Furnace

 

Heater

 

 

 

 

Equipment Located in Confined Spaces;

All Air from Outdoors Through Ventilated Attic.

See 5.3.3-b.

 

 

 

Equipment Located in Confined Spaces;

All Air from Inside Building. See 5.3.3-a.

 

(b) All Air from Outdoors: The confined space shall be provided

with two permanent openings, one commencing within 12

inches of the top and one commencing within 12 inches of the

bottom of the enclosure. The openings shall communicate

directly, or by ducts, with the outdoors or spaces (crawl or attic)

that freely communicate with the outdoors.

1. When directly communicating with the outdoors, each

opening shall have a minimum free area of 1 square inch per

4,000 BTU per hour of total input rating of all equipment in

the enclosure.

Chimney or Gas Vent

 

 

 

 

3. When communicating with the outdoors through horizontal

ducts, each opening shall have a minimum free area of 1

square inch per 2,000 BTU per hour of total input rating of

all equipment in the enclosure.

 

 

Chimney or Gas Vent

 

 

NOTE: The air duct openings

must have a free area of not

less than one square inch per

2000 BTU of the total input

rating of all equipment in the

enclosure*.

 

(each end of attic)

NOTE: The inlet and outlet air

openings must each have a free

area of not less than one square

inch per 4000 BTU of the

total input rating of all equipment

in the enclosure.

 

 

 

Furnace

 

 

Water

Heater

 

Outlet air duct

 

 

 

Inlet air duct

 

 

 

 

Alternate

air inlet

 

 

 

Furnace

 

 

Water

Heater

 

 

 

 

Ventilation louvers for

unheated crawl space

 

 

 

 

*If the appliance room is located against an outside wall and the air openings communicate

directly with the outdoors, each opening shall have a free area of not less than one square inch

per 4,000 BTU per hour of the total input rating of all appliances in the enclosure.

Equipment Located in Confined Spaces;

All Air from Outdoors. See 5.3.3-b.

 

4. When ducts are used, they shall be of the same cross-

sectional area as the free area of the openings to which they

 

Equipment Located in Confined Spaces;

All Air from Outdoors—Inlet Air from Ventilated

Crawl Space and Outlet Air to Ventilated Attic.

See 5.3.3-b

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

connect. The minimum dimension of rectangular air ducts

shall not be less than 3 inches.

 

Combustion and Ventilation Air Requirements

 

 

NOTE: The single opening must have

a free area of not less than one

square inch per 3000 BTU of

the total input rating of all equip-

ment in the enclosure, but not less than

the sum of the areas of all vent

connectors in the confined space.

 

 

 

Chimney or Gas Vent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water

Heater

Furnace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Opening

 

Opening

Location

 

 

5.3.4 Specially Engineered Installations:

The requirements of 5.3.3 shall not necessarily govern when special

engineering, approved by the authority having jurisdiction, pro-

vides an adequate supply of air for combustion, ventilation, and

dilution of flue gases.

5.3.5 Louvers and Grilles:

In calculating free area in 5.3.3, consideration shall be given to the

blocking effect of louvers, grilles or screens protecting openings.

Screens used shall not be smaller than 1/4 inch mesh. If the area

through a design of louver or grille is known, it should be used in

calculating the size of opening required to provide the free area

specified. If the design and free area is not known, it may be

assumed that wood louvers will have 20-25 percent free area and

metal louvers and grilles will have 60-75 percent free area. Louvers

and grilles shall be fixed in the open position or interlocked with the

 

Equipment Located in Confined Spaces; All Air

from Outdoors – Single Air Opening. See 5.3.3-b.

 

5. When directly communicating with the outdoors, the single

opening shall have a minimum free area of 1 square inch per

3,000 BTU per hour of total input rating of all equipment in

the enclosure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

equipment so that they are opened automatically during equipment

operation.

5.3.6 Special Conditions Created by Mechanical Exhausting or

Fireplaces:

Operation of exhaust fans, ventilation systems, clothes dryers, or

fireplaces may create conditions requiring special attention to avoid

unsatisfactory operation of installed gas utilization equipment. Air

from Inside Building. See 5.3.3-a.

 

Category I Venting (Vertical Venting)

 

 

WARNING

 

To prevent possible death or personal injury due to asphyxiation, this Non-Condensing Gas Fired Warm Air

Furnace must be Category I vented. Do not vent using Category III venting.

 

 

Category I Venting is venting at a non-positive pressure. A furnace vented as Category I is considered a fan-assisted

appliance and the vent system does not have to be “gas tight.” NOTE: Single stage gas furnaces with induced draft

blowers draw products of combustion through a heat exchanger allowing, in some instances, common venting

with natural draft appliances (i.e. water heaters).

All installations must be vented in accordance with National Fuel Gas Code NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1 – latest edition. In

Canada, the furnaces must be vented in accordance with the National Standard of Canada, CAN/CSA B149.1 and CAN/

CSA B149.2 – latest editions and amendments.

NOTE: The vertical height of the Category I venting system must be at least as great as the horizontal length of the venting

system.

 

WARNING

 

To prevent possible death or personal injury due to asphyxiation, common venting with other manufacturer’s

induced draft appliances is not allowed.

 

 

Common venting of this furnace is allowed with the addition of a common vent kit (CVK) for each appliance. Contact the

local installing dealer, distributor or us directly for more information.

The minimum vent diameter for the Category I venting system is as shown below:

 

MODEL MINIMUM VENT

 

70

90

115

140

 

DIAMETER

4 Inch

4 Inch

5 Inch

5 Inch

 

 

 

Under some conditions, larger vents than those shown above may be required or allowed.

 

When an existing furnace is removed from a venting system serving other appliances, the venting system may be too large

to properly vent the remaining attached appliances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

 

Category I Venting (Vertical Venting)

 

INDUCED DRAFT BLOWER RELOCATION

Upflow Upright or Horizontal units are shipped with the

induced draft blower discharging from the top of the fur-

nace. (“Top” is as viewed for an upflow installation.) The

induced draft blower can be rotated 90 degrees counter-

clockwise for Category I venting, with the airflow horizontal

left to right. For horizontal installations, a four inch single

wall pipe can be used to extend the induced draft blower

outlet 1/2” beyond the furnace cabinet. Vent the furnace in

accordance with the National Fuel Gas Code NFPA 54/

ANSI Z223.1 – latest edition. In Canada, vent the furnace

in accordance with the National Standard of Canada, CAN/

CSA B149.1 and CAN/CSA B149.2 – latest editions and

amendments.

Blower Assembly

 

3. Remove and save the four screws which hold the ro-

tation plate on the partition panel. Note that one of

the screws which hold the induced draft blower on

the rotation plate needs to be removed.

4. Turn the rotation plate 90 degrees counterclockwise.

 

Supply

Air

 

 

 

 

Upflow Rotated Induced Draft Blower

 

To rotate the induced draft blower counterclockwise pro-

ceed as follows:

1. Disconnect electrical power from furnace.

 

WARNING

 

To prevent death or personal injury due to electrical

shock, disconnect electrical power.

2. Remove the round cutout from the side of the fur-

nace.

NOTE: The assembly, starting from the outside,

is induced draft blower, outer gasket, rotation

plate, inner gasket, partition panel).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

 

The inner gasket must turn with the rotation plate.

5. Reinstall the rotation plate on the partition panel, us-

ing the four screws removed in step 3. Tighten

screws to provide an airtight seal.

6. Make sure all wires are at least one inch from flue

pipe. Relocate junction box to right side of cabinet if

necessary. Refer to Electrical Connections for in-

structions.

 

WARNING

 

To prevent death or serious illness to building

occupants due to flue products leaking into the

building, proper installation of gaskets and screws is

essential for providing a gas tight seal between the

partition panel and the induced draft blower.

 

Category I Venting (Vertical Venting)

 

 

WARNING

 

To prevent death, personal injury or property damage due to fire or explosion, a qualified servicer must determine

the reason the rollout protection device opened before the device is reset.

 

ROLLOUT PROTECTION DEVICE RELOCATION

Furnaces installed horizontal right-to-left airflow, require

the rollout protection device be relocated. This device

closes the gas valve if the burner flames are not drawn into

the heat exchanger.

Vent

 

 

 

 

Supply

Air

 

 

 

Right To Left Installation

 

To relocate:

1. Disconnect electrical power.

 

WARNING

 

 

 

 

Return

Air

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rollout Switch Relocation

 

6. Secure rollout wires to manifold and insure no wires

can come in contact with burners or other hot sur-

 

To prevent death or personal injury due to electric

shock, disconnect electrical power.

 

2. Remove the cover from the burner box. Save the

screws that held it in place. (Note: There are several

screw holes, but only four screws. This is intentional,

and not a manufacturing defect.)

3. As shipped, the rollout protection device is located

near the flame sensor end of the manifold assembly.

Remove and save the mounting screws.

4. For most installations, it will not be necessary to re-

move the wires from the rollout protection device.

5. For horizontal-left installations, a hole is provided

near the igniter end of the manifold assembly. Insert

the rollout protection device into this hole and attach

with screws removed in Step 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

 

faces.

7. Push the button to confirm the rollout control is in the

closed position.

8. Replace the cover on the burner box, replacing the

screws from Step 2.

 

Electrical Connections

 

 

WARNING

 

To avoid the risk of electrical shock, wiring to the unit must be properly polarized and grounded.

 

 

WARNING

 

To avoid electrical shock, injury or death, disconnect electrical power before servicing or changing any electrical

wiring.

 

 

CAUTION

 

Label all wires prior to disconnection when servicing controls. Wiring errors can cause improper and dangerous

operation. Verify proper operation after servicing.

 

 

WARNING

 

To avoid the risk of electrical shock, injury, or death, the furnace must be electrically grounded in accordance with

local codes or, in their absence, with the latest edition of The National Electric Code.

 

 

Wiring Harness

 

The wiring harness is an integral part of this furnace. Field

alteration to comply with electrical codes should not be

required. Wires are color and number coded for identifica-

tion purposes. Refer to the wiring diagram for wire routings.

If any of the original wire as supplied with the furnace must

be replaced, it must be replaced with wiring material having

a temperature rating of at least 105°C. Any replacement

wiring must be copper conductor.

 

115 Volt Line Connections

 

Before proceeding with electrical connections, ensure that

the supply voltage, frequency, and phase correspond to

that specified on the unit rating plate. Power supply to the

furnace must be N.E.C. Class 1, and must comply with all

applicable codes. The furnace must be electrically grounded

in accordance with local codes or, in their absence, with the

latest edition of The National Electric Code, ANSI NFPA 70

and/or The Canadian Electric Code CSA C22.1.

Use a separate fused branch electrical circuit containing

properly sized wire, and fuse or circuit breaker. The fuse

or circuit breaker must be sized in accordance with the

maximum overcurrent protection specified on the unit

rating plate. An electrical disconnect must be provided at

the furnace location.

NOTE: Line polarity must be observed when making

field connections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

 

 

Junction Box Relocation

 

Line polarity must be observed when making field connec-

tions. Line voltage connections can be made through

either the right or left side panel. The furnace is shipped

configured for a right side electrical connection with the

junction box located on the left side of the furnace. To

make electrical connections through the opposite side of

the furnace, the junction box must be relocated to the other

side prior to making electrical connections. To relocate the

junction box, perform the steps that follow.

 

CAUTION

 

Edges of sheet metal holes may be sharp. Use

gloves as a precaution when removing hole plugs.

 

1. Remove both doors from the furnace.

2. Remove and save the screws holding the junction

box to the right side of the furnace.

3. Disconnect the hose from the pressure switch.

Leave the other end attached to the induced draft

blower.

4. Remove four wires to the pressure switch assembly.

5. Swap locations of the two bushings in the junction

box.

 

Electrical Connections

 

 

6. Rotate the junction box 180 degrees so the access

panel continues to face forward. The open snap

bushing should now be on the left.

7. Attach pressure switch bracket to left side of furnace

where the junction box was using the screws saved

in Step 4. The “L” bracket must point toward the

front of the furnace. Reroute pressure switch wires

through the split grommet on the left side of the

blower deck. Reconnect wires using the wiring dia-

gram inside the blower door.

8. Reroute remaining wires through split grommet on

the right side of the blower deck.

9. Insert remaining wires through the open bushing in

the bottom of the junction box.

10. Attach the junction box to the right side of the fur-

nace, using the screws removed in step 2.

11. Reconnect the hose to the pressure switch.

12. Check the location of the pressure hose and all wir-

ing. Confirm that it will not be damaged by heat from

the burners or by the rotation of the fan. Also confirm

that wiring location will not interfere with filter re-

moval or other maintenance.

After the junction box is in the desired location, use wash-

ers to connect field-supplied conduit to the junction box in

accordance with NEC and local codes. Connect hot, neu-

tral, and ground wires as shown in the furnace wiring

diagram. The wires and ground screw are located in the

furnace junction box.

Low voltage wires may be connected to the terminal strip

as shown in the “Integrated Ignition Control” figure.

IMPORTANT NOTE: To avoid possible equipment mal-

function, route the low voltage wires to avoid interference

with filter removal or other maintenance.

 

 

NOTE: Do not use gas piping as an electrical ground.

To confirm proper unit grounding, turn off the electrical

power and perform the following check.

1. Measure resistance between the neutral (white) con-

nection and one of the burners.

2. Resistance should measure 10 ohms or less.

This furnace is equipped with a blower door interlock

switch which interrupts unit voltage when the blower door

is opened for servicing. Do not defeat this switch.

 

24 VOLT THERMOSTAT WIRING

NOTE: Wire routing must not interfere with circulator

blower operation, filter removal, or routine maintenance.

As a two-stage furnace, the furnace integrated control

module provides terminals for both “W1” and “W2”, and

“YLO” and “Y” thermostat connections. This allows the

furnace to support the following system applications: ‘Two-

Stage Heating Only’, ‘Two-Stage Heating with Single-

Stage Cooling’, and ‘Two-Stage Heating with Two-Stage

Cooling’. Refer to the following figures and table for proper

connections to the integrated control module.

Low voltage connections can be made through either the

right or left side panel. Thermostat wiring entrance holes

are located in the blower compartment. Wire routing must

not interfere with circulator blower operation, filter removal,

or routine maintenance.

This furnace is equipped with a 40 VA transformer to

facilitate use with most cooling equipment. Consult the

wiring diagram, located on the blower compartment door,

for further details of 115 Volt and 24 Volt wiring.

 

SINGLE STAGE THERMOSTAT APPLICATION

 

Thermostat

Single-Stage Heating

with

 

WARNING

 

To avoid the risk of electrical shock, injury, or death,

the furnace must be electrically grounded in

 

Y W

 

G R

 

 

accordance with local codes or, in their absence,

with the latest edition of The National Electric Code.

 

O YLO Y

 

 

NEU

 

Furnace Integrated

Control Module

 

To ensure proper unit grounding, the ground wire should

run from the furnace ground screw located inside the

furnace junction box all the way back to the electrical panel.

 

Y C

 

Remote

Condensing Unit

(Single-Stage Cooling)

 

HOT

 

[Optional]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

 

Single-Stage Heating with Single-Stage Cooling

NOTE: To apply a single-stage heating thermostat, the

thermostat selector jumper on the integrated Control

module must be set on single stage.

 

 

 

 

 

W2

 

Electrical Connections

 

The furnace’s integrated ignition control is equipped with

Thermostat

Two-Stage Heating

with

 

Y

 

 

 

 

G

 

 

 

 

R

 

W1

 

(Single-Stage Coolin)g

 

-163line voltage accessory terminals for controlling power to an

optional field-supplied humidifier and/or electronic air

cleaner.

The accessory load specifications are as follows:

Humidifier 1.0 Amp maximum at 120 VAC

 

O YLO Y

 

B/C G R W1 W2

 

NEU

 

DEHUM

TWIN

 

Furnace Integrated

Control Module

 

Electronic Air Cleaner 1.0 Amp maximum at 120 VAC

 

Turn OFF power to the furnace before installing any

 

Y C

Remote

Condensing Unit

(Single-Stage Cooling)

 

HOT

 

Dehumidistat

[Optional]

 

accessories. Follow the humidifier or air cleaner manufac-

turers’ instructions for locating, mounting, grounding, and

controlling these accessories. Accessory wiring connec-

tions are to be made through the 1/4″ quick connect

 

 

 

 

 

Y YLO W2 W1 (Two-Stage Cooling)

 

 

G R

 

terminals provided on the furnace integrated ignition con-

trol. The humidifier and electronic air cleaner hot and

neutral terminals are identified as HUM and EAC. All field

wiring must conform to applicable codes. Connections

should be made as shown in the “Accessories Wiring”

figure.

Control Module

Hot 120 VAC Neutral 120 VAC

 

 

O YLO Y

 

 

B/C G R W1 W2

 

NEU

 

 

 

DEHUM

TWIN

 

 

Furnace Integrated

Control Module

 

YLO Y C

 

Remote

 

HOT

 

Dehumidistat

 

 

Optional

Accessories {

 

Air Cleaner

Humidifier

 

(Two-Stage Cooling)

Two-Stage Heating with Two-Stage Cooling

 

Thermostat Diagrams

This furnace is equipped with a 40 VA transformer to

facilitate use with most cooling equipment. Consult the

wiring diagram, located on the blower compartment door,

for further details of 115 Volt and 24 Volt wiring.115 Volt

Line Connection of Accessories (Humidifier and Elec-

tronic Air Cleaner)

 

WARNING

 

To avoid electrical shock, injury or death, disconnect

electrical power before servicing, or changing any

electrical wiring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

 

Accessories Wiring

If it is necessary for the installer to supply additional line

voltage wiring to the inside of the furnace, the wiring must

conform to all local codes, and have a minimum tempera-

ture rating of 105°C. All line voltage wire splices must be

made inside the furnace junction box.

The integrated ignition control humidifier terminals (HUM)

are energized with 115 volts whenever the induced draft

blower is energized. The integrated ignition control elec-

tronic air cleaner terminals (EAC) are energized with 115

volts whenever the circulator blower is energized.

 

Gas Supply and Piping

 

Proper Piping Practice

 

The gas line installation must comply with local codes, or in the absence of local codes, with the latest edition of the

National Fuel Gas Code NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1.

IMPORTANT NOTE: This unit is factory set to operate on natural gas at the altitudes shown on the rating plate. The plate

is stamped with the model number, type of gas and gas input rating. Make sure the unit is equipped to operate on the

type of gas available.

 

DO NOT VARY FROM THE MINIMUM SUPPLY PRESSURE GIVEN IN TABLE 1.

Doing so could create ignition problems.

 

DO NOT EXCEED THE RATED INPUT SHOWN ON THE RATING PLATE.

Overfiring of the unit could result in premature heat exchanger failure.

 

DO NOT UNDERSIZE THE NATURAL/PROPANE GAS PIPING FROM THE METER/TANK TO THE UNIT.

Doing so could cause unsatisfactory operation or equipment damage due to under firing of equipment.

When sizing a trunk line (Table 2), include all appliances on that line that could be operated simultaneously.

 

Natural Gas Capacity of Pipe

in Cubic Feet of Gas Per Hour (CFH)

Nominal Black Pipe Size (inches)

Length of

 

Pipe in Feet 1/2

 

3/4

 

1

 

1 1/4 1 1/2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inlet Gas Pressure

Min. 5.0″ W.C., Max. 10.0″ W.C.

 

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

 

132

92

73

63

56

50

46

43

40

38

 

278

190

152

130

115

105

96

90

84

79

 

520

350

285

245

215

195

180

170

160

150

 

1050

730

590

500

440

400

370

350

320

305

 

1600

1100

980

760

670

610

560

530

490

460

 

Propane

 

Min. 11.0″ W.C., Max. 13.0″ W.C.

 

Pressure = .50 PSIG or less and Pressure Drop of 0.3″ W.C. (Based

on 0.60 Specific Gravity Gas)

 

Inlet Gas Pressure Must Not Exceed the Maximum Value Shown in

Table Above.

 

 

Table 1

 

 

CFH =

 

 

BTUH Furnace Input

Heating Value of Gas (BTU/Cubic Foot)

Table 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

WARNING

 

To prevent death, personal injury or property damage when either using propane gas alone or at higher altitudes,

obtain and install the proper conversion kit(s). Failure to do so can result in unsatisfactory operation and/or

equipment damage. High altitude kits are for U.S. installations only and are not approved for use in Canada.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

 

Gas Supply and Piping

 

High Altitude Derate

 

When this furnace is installed at high altitude, the appropriate High Altitude orifice kit must be applied. This is required due

to the natural reduction in the density of both the gas fuel and combustion air as altitude increases. The kit will provide

the proper design certified input rate within the specified altitude range.

High altitude kits are purchased according to the installation altitude and usage of either natural or propane gas. Refer

to the product Specification Sheet for a tabular listing of appropriate altitude ranges and corresponding manufacturer’s high

altitude (natural, propane gas, and/or pressure switch) kits.

Do not derate the furnace by adjusting the manifold pressure to a lower pressure than specified on the furnace rating plate.

The combination of the lower air density and a lower manifold pressure will prohibit the burner orifice from drawing the

proper amount of air into the burner. This may cause incomplete combustion, flashback, and possible yellow tipping.

In some areas the gas supplier may artificially derate the gas in an effort to compensate for the effects of altitude. If the

gas is artificially derated, the appropriate orifice size must be determined based upon the BTU/ft3 content of the derated

gas and the altitude. Refer to the National Fuel Gas Code, NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1, and information provided by the gas

supplier to determine the proper orifice size.

A different pressure switch may be required at high altitude regardless of the BTU/ft3 content of the fuel used. Refer to the

product Specification Sheet for a tabular listing of appropriate altitude ranges and corresponding manufacturer’s pressure

switch kits.

 

Gas Piping Connections

 

The gas piping supplying the furnace must be properly sized based on the gas flow required, specific gravity of the gas,

and length of the run. The gas line installation must comply with local codes, or in their absence, with the latest edition

of the National Fuel Gas Code, NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1.

To connect the furnace to the building’s gas piping, the installer must supply a ground joint union, drip leg, manual shutoff

valve, and line and fittings to connect to gas valve. In some cases, the installer may also need to supply a transition piece

from 1/2″ pipe to a larger pipe size.

 

 

 

The following rules apply when installing piping:

1. Use black iron or steel pipe and fittings for the build-

ing piping.

 

2. Use pipe joint compound on male threads only. Pipe

joint compound must be resistant to the action of the

fuel used.

3. Use ground joint unions.

4. Install a drip leg to trap dirt and moisture before it

can enter the gas valve. The drip leg must be a mini-

mum of three inches long.

5. Install 1/8” NPT pipe plug fitting, accessible for test

gage connection, upstream of the gas supply con-

nection to the furnace.

6. Use two pipe wrenches when making connection to

the gas valve to keep it from turning. Maintain factory

shipped orientation.

7. Install a manual shutoff valve in a convenient loca-

tion between the meter and the unit within six feet of

unit. Any union installed, must be downstream of the

manual shutoff valve and located between the shut-

off valve and furnace.

8. Tighten all joints securely.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20

 

Location of Manual Valve

(Installed Ahead of Ground

Joint Pipe Union)

 

Height Required

By Local Code

Ground Joint Pipe Union

To Be Installed Ahead Of

Gas Valve

 

Drip Leg

 

Reducing Coupling

1/2″ x 1/8″ with 1/8″

Pipe Plug To Measure

Line Gas Pressure

 

 

 

Gas Piping Connections

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gas Supply and Piping

 

9. The unit must be connected to the building piping by

one of the following methods:

• Rigid metallic pipe and fittings

• Semirigid metallic tubing and metallic fittings (Alumi-

num alloy tubing must not be used in exterior loca-

tions)

• Listed gas appliance connectors used in accor-

dance with the terms of their listing that are com-

pletely in the same room as the equipment

• Protect connectors and semirigid tubing against

physical and thermal damage when installed. En-

sure aluminum-alloy tubing and connectors are Gas Inlet Through Furnace Left Side

coated to protect against external corrosion when in

contact with masonry, plaster, or insulation, or sub-

jected to repeated wetting by liquids such as water

(except rain water), detergents, or sewage.

 

Inlet Piping

 

When the gas piping enters through the right side of the

furnace, the installer must supply the following fittings

(starting from the gas valve):

• 90 degree elbows (2).

• Close nipple.

• Straight pipe to reach the exterior of the furnace.

A ground joint union, drip leg, and manual shutoff valve

must also be supplied by the installer. In some cases, the

installer may also need to supply a transition piece from

1/2″ to another pipe size.

When the gas piping enters through the left side of the

furnace, the installer must supply the following fittings

 

(starting from the gas valve):

• Straight pipe to reach the exterior of the furnace.

• A ground joint union, drip leg, and manual shutoff valve

must also be supplied by the installer. In some cases,

the installer may also need to supply a transition piece

from 1/2 inch to another pipe size.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gas Inlet Through Furnace Right Side

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21

 

Gas Inlet Through Furnace Bottom Side

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gas Inlet Through Furnace Top Side

 

Gas Supply and Piping

 

Gas Piping Checks

 

 

WARNING

 

To avoid the possibility of explosion or fire, never use a match or open flame to test for leaks.

 

 

CAUTION

 

To prevent personal injury or property damage due to fire, the following instructions must be performed regarding

gas connections, pressure testing, location of shutoff valve and installation of gas piping.

 

Before placing unit in operation, leak test the unit and gas connections.

Check for leaks using an approved chloride-free soap and water solution, an electronic combustible gas detector, or other

approved testing methods.

 

NOTE: Never exceed specified pressures for testing. Higher pressure may damage the gas valve and cause

subsequent overfiring, resulting in heat exchanger failure.

 

Disconnect this unit and shutoff valve from the gas supply piping system before pressure testing the supply piping system

with pressures in excess of 1/2 psig (3.48 kPa).

Isolate this unit from the gas supply piping system by closing its external manual gas shutoff valve before pressure testing

supply piping system with test pressures equal to or less than 1/2 psig (3.48 kPa).

 

Propane Gas and/or High Altitude Installations

 

WARNING

 

Possible death, personal injury or property damage may occur if the correct conversion kits are not installed. The

appropriate kits must be applied to insure safe and proper furnace operation. All conversions must be performed

by a qualified installer or service agency.

 

This furnace is shipped from the factory configured for natural gas at standard altitude. Propane gas installations require

an orifice change to compensate for the energy content difference between natural and propane gas.

High altitude installations may require both a pressure switch and an orifice change. These changes are necessary to

compensate for the natural reduction in the density of both the gas fuel and the combustion air at higher altitude.

Refer to the product Specification Sheet for a tabular listing of appropriate manufacturer’s kits for propane gas and/or high

altitude installations. The indicated kits are required to insure safe and proper furnace operation. All conversions must

be performed by a qualified installer or service agency.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22

 

Propane Gas Tanks and Piping

 

 

 

 

WARNING

 

 

PERSONAL INJURY HAZARD

 

To prevent death, personal injury, or property damage due to fire or explosion from a propane gas leak, install a

gas detecting warning device. A gas detecting warning device is the only reliable way to detect a propane gas

leak. Do not rely on smell as rust can reduce the level of odorant in propane gas.

 

Remember:

• Propane gas is heavier than air and leaking gas can settle in any low area or confined space.

• A propane gas odor can fade, making the gas undetectable.

• A warning device is a required item, if the propane gas unit is installed in either a basement, an excavated area or

a confined space.

If the presence of gas is suspected:

• Do not try to light any appliance.

• Do not touch any electrical switch or use any phone in your building.

• Immediately call your gas supplier from a neighbor’s phone. Follow the gas supplier’s instructions.

• If you cannot reach your gas supplier, call the fire department.

 

IN CANADA “THE CONVERSION SHALL BE CARRIED OUT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF

THE PROVINCIAL AUTHORITIES HAVING JURISDICTION AND IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF

THE CAN/CSA B149.1 AND B149.2 INSTALLATION CODE.”

 

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Propane gas conversion kits must

be installed to convert units to propane gas. See

Specification Sheet for kit part number for this model.

All propane gas equipment must conform to the safety

standards of the National Board of Fire Underwriters (See

NBFU Manual 58).

For satisfactory operation, propane gas supply pressure

must be 11 inch W.C. at the unit manifold with all gas

 

 

Since propane gas will quickly dissolve white lead and

most standard commercial compounds, special pipe dope

must be used. Shellac-based compounds resistant to the

actions of liquefied petroleum gases such as Gasolac®,

Stalactic®, Clyde’s® or John Crane® are satisfactory.

Refer to the following illustration for typical propane gas

installations.

 

appliances in operation. Maintaining proper gas pressure

depends on three main factors:

1. Vaporization rate, which depends on (a) temperature

of the liquid, and (b) wetted surface area of the con-

tainer or containers.

2. Proper pressure regulation. (Two-stage regulation is

recommended for both cost and efficiency).

3. Pressure drop in lines between regulators, and be-

tween second stage regulator and the appliance.

Pipe size required will depend on length of pipe run

 

First Stage

Regulator

 

 

 

 

 

 

200 PSIG

Maximum

 

5 to 15 PSIG

(20 PSIG Max.)

 

 

Continuous

11″ W.C.

 

 

Second Stage

Regulator

 

and total load of all appliances.

Complete information regarding tank sizing for vaporiza-

tion, recommended regulator settings, and pipe sizing is

available from most regulator manufacturers and propane

gas suppliers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23

 

Propane Gas Installation (Typ.)

 

Propane Gas Tanks and Piping

 

 

 

Sizing Between First and Second Stage Regulator*

Maximum Propane Capacities listed are based on 2 psig pressure drop at 10 psig setting.

Capacities in 1,000 BTU/hour.

 

Pipe or

 

Nominal Pipe Size

 

Tubing

 

Tubing Size, O.D. Type L

 

Schedule 40

 

Length,

Feet

10

20

30

40

50

60

80

100

125

150

175

200

 

3/8″

 

730

500

400

370

330

300

260

220

200

190

170

160

 

1/2″

 

1,700

1,100

920

850

770

700

610

540

490

430

400

380

 

5/8″

 

3,200

2,200

2,000

1,700

1,500

1,300

1,200

1,000

900

830

780

730

 

3/4″

 

5,300

3,700

2,900

2,700

2,400

2,200

1,900

1,700

1,400

1,300

1,200

1,100

 

7/8″

 

8,300

5,800

4,700

4,100

3,700

3,300

2,900

2,600

2,300

2,100

1,900

1,800

 

1/2″

 

3,200

2,200

1,800

1,600

1,500

1,300

1,200

1,000

900

830

770

720

 

3/4″

 

7,500

4,200

4,000

3,700

3,400

3,100

2,600

2,300

2,100

1,900

1,700

1,500

 

To convert to capacities at 15 psig settings – multiply by 1.130

To convert to capacities at 5 psig settings – multiply by 0.879

 

 

 

 

 

Sizing Between Single or Second Stage Regulator and Appliance*

Maximum Propane Capacities Listed are Based on 1/2″ W.C. pressure drop at 11″ W.C. setting.

Capacities in 1,000 BTU/hour.

 

Pipe or

 

Nominal Pipe Size

 

Tubing

 

Tubing Size, O.D. Type L

 

Schedule 40

 

Length, 3/8″ 1/2″ 5/8″ 3/4″ 7/8″ 1-1/8″ 1/2″ 3/4″

Feet

 

1″ 1-1/4″ 1-1/2″

 

10

20

30

 

39

26

21

 

92

62

50

 

199 329 501 935 275 567 1,071 2,205 3,307

131 216 346 630 189 393 732 1,496 2,299

107 181 277 500 152 315 590 1,212 1,858

 

40

50

60

 

19

18

16

 

41

37

35

 

90

79

72

 

145 233 427 129 267 504 1,039 1,559

131 198 376 114 237 448 913 1,417

121 187 340 103 217 409 834 1,275

 

80

 

13

 

29

 

62

 

104 155 289

 

89

 

185 346 724 1,066

 

100

125

150

200

 

11

10

9

8

 

26

24

21

19

 

55

48

43

39

 

90

81

72

66

 

138 255

122 224

109 202

100 187

 

78

69

63

54

 

162 307 630 976

146 275 567 866

132 252 511 787

112 209 439 665

 

250

 

8

 

17

 

36

 

60

 

93

 

172

 

48

 

100 185 390 590

 

 

*Data in accordance with NFPA pamphlet NO. 54

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24

 

Circulating Air and Filters

 

 

Ductwork Sizing

Duct systems and register sizes must be properly de-

signed for the CFM and external static pressure rating of

the furnace. Ductwork should be designed in accordance

with the recommended methods of “Air Conditioning

Contractors of America” Manual D.

A duct system must be installed in accordance with Stan-

dards of the National Board of Fire Underwriters for the

Installation of Air Conditioning, Warm Air Heating and

Ventilating Systems. Pamphlets No. 90A and 90B.

A closed return duct system must be used, with the return

duct connected to the furnace. NOTE: Ductwork must

never be attached to the back of the furnace. Supply

and return connections to the furnace may be made with

flexible joints to reduce noise transmission. To prevent the

blower from interfering with combustion air or draft when a

central return is used, a connecting duct must be installed

between the unit and the utility room wall. A room, closet,

or alcove must not be used as a return air chamber.

When the furnace is used in connection with a cooling unit,

the furnace should be installed in parallel with or on the

upstream side of the cooling unit to avoid condensation in

the heating element. With a parallel flow arrangement, the

 

 

NOTE: An undersized opening will cause reduced

airflow.

Units with an air delivery of less than 1800 CFM should

either use the bottom return or one-side return.

Units with an air delivery of 1800 CFM or higher must either

use a two-side return combination or a one-side return and

one bottom return combination. These combinations pro-

vide proper airflow through the unit.

To ensure proper unit performance follow the filter sizes

given in the Specifications Sheet.

 

Upright Installations

 

Depending on the installation and/or customer preference,

differing filter arrangements can be applied. Filters can be

installed in the central return register, the bottom of the

blower compartment, a side panel external filter rack kit, or

inside the side panel. As an alternative a media air filter or

electronic air cleaner can be used as the requested filter.

Review and follow the filter sizes given in the Specifica-

tions Sheet to ensure proper unit performance. The

following figures show possible filter locations.

 

dampers or other means used to control the flow of air must

be adequate to prevent chilled air from entering the furnace

and, if manually operated, must be equipped with means

to prevent operation of either unit unless the damper is in

the full heat or cool position.

When the furnace is installed without a cooling coil, it is

recommended that a removable access panel be provided

in the outlet air duct. This opening shall be accessible

when the furnace is installed and shall be of such a size that

the heat exchanger can be viewed for visual light inspec-

tion or such that a sampling probe can be inserted into the

airstream. The access panel must be made to prevent air

leaks when the furnace is in operation.

When the furnace is heating, the temperature of the return

air entering the furnace must be between 55°F and 100°F.

 

CENTRAL

RETURN

GRILLE

 

 

 

 

 

SIDE RETURN

EXTERNAL FILTER

RACK KIT

(EITHER SIDE)

 

AIR FLOW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F I L T E R

 

 

 

 

 

 

SIDE RETURN

INTERNAL FILTER

RETENTION

(EITHER SIDE)

 

When a furnace is installed so that supply ducts carry air

circulated by the furnace to areas outside the space

containing the furnace, the return air shall also be handled

by a duct sealed to the furnace casing and terminating

outside the space containing the furnace.

 

Filters

READ THIS SECTION BEFORE INSTALLING THE RETURN

AIR DUCTWORK

Filters must be used with this furnace. Discuss filter main-

tenance with the building owner. Filters do not ship with

this furnace, but must be provided by the installer. Filters

must comply with UL900 or CAN/ULCS111 standards. If

the furnace is installed without filters, the warranty will be

voided.

Use a straight edge to scribe lines, connect the guide

dimples located on the side return cutout locations. Cut

out the opening on these lines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25

 

Possible Filter Locations

 

 

 

Horizontal Installations

 

Filters must be installed in either the central return register

or in the return air duct work.

Refer to the Specification Sheet for recommended mini-

mum filter sizes.

 

Startup Adjustments and Measurements

 

Furnace must have a 115 VAC power supply properly connected and grounded. Proper polarity must be maintained for

correct operation. An interlock switch prevents furnace operation if the blower door is not in place. Keep the blower access

door in place except for inspection and maintenance.

This furnace is also equipped with a self-diagnosing electronic control module. In the event a furnace component is not

operating properly, the control module LED will flash on and off in a factory-programmed sequence, depending on the

problem encountered. This light can be viewed through the observation window in the blower access door. Refer to the

Troubleshooting Chart for further explanation of the lighting codes.

On new installations, or if a functional part such as the gas valve, pressure switch, or limit control has been replaced, verify

that the furnace is operating properly after servicing.

Check furnace operation as outlined in the following instructions. If any sparking, odors, or unusual noises are

encountered, shut off electrical power and recheck for wiring errors, or obstructions in or near the blower motors. Various

shipping materials must be removed before the blower motor is operated. In addition to the following startup adjustments

and measurements items, refer to further information in Operational Checks.

 

Furnace Operation

 

 

Purge gas lines of air prior to startup. Be sure not purge lines into an enclosed burner compartment.

Check for leaks using an approved chloride-free soap and water solution, an electronic combustible gas detector, or other

approved method. Verify that all required kits (propane gas, high altitude, etc.) have been appropriately installed.

NOTE: An interlock switch prevents furnace operation if the blower door is not in place. Keep the blower access

doors in place except for inspection and maintenance.

 

 

FURNACE STARTUP

1. Close the manual gas shut-off valve external to the

furnace.

2. Turn off the electrical power to the furnace.

3. Set the room thermostat to the lowest possible set-

ting.

4. Remove the burner compartment door.

 

NOTE: This furnace is equipped with an electronic

ignition device which automatically lights the burner.

Do not try to light the burner by hand.

 

5. Turn the gas control knob clockwise to the

OFF position. Note: The knob should turn easily.

Do not use excessive force.

 

6. Wait five minutes then smell for gas. Be sure check

near the floor as some types of gas are heavier than

air.

7. If you smell gas after five minutes, immediately follow

the instructions on page 4 of this manual. If you do

not smell gas after five minutes:

Turn the gas control knob counterclockwise

to the ON position. The knob should turn easily. Do

not use excessive force.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ON

 

8. Replace the burner compartment door.

9. Open the manual gas shut-off valve external to the

furnace.

 

Inlet Pressure Tap

(Side of Valve)

Gas Valve

Control Knob

 

Low Manifold

Regulator Adjustment

Screw (Under Cap)

 

Outlet (Manifold)

Pressure Tap

(Side of Valve)

 

 

 

26

 

White-Rodgers Model 36E96

 

Startup Adjustments and Measurements

 

 

Measure Gas Supply Pressure

 

 

CAUTION

 

To prevent unreliable operation or equipment

damage, the inlet gas supply pressure must be as

specified on the unit rating plate with all other

household gas fired appliances operating.

 

The line pressure supplied to the gas valve must be within

the range specified in the “Inlet Gas Supply Pressure”

table.

Inlet Gas Supply Pressure

Natural Gas Minimum:5.0″ W.C. Maximum :10.0″ W.C.

Propane Gas Minimum:11.0″ W.C. Maximum :13.0″ W.C.

Measure the supply pressure at the gas valve inlet pres-

sure tap or at a hose fitting installed in the gas piping drip

leg. The supply pressure must be measured with the

burners operating. To measure the gas supply pressure,

use the following procedure.

1. Turn OFF gas to furnace at the manual gas shutoff

valve external to the furnace.

2. Connect a calibrated water manometer (or appropri-

ate gas pressure gauge) at either the gas valve inlet

pressure tap or the gas piping drip leg.

NOTE: At either location, a hose fitting must be installed

prior to making the hose connection.

 

Gas

Shutoff

Valve

 

 

Gas Line

To Furnace

 

Open To

Atmosphere

 

 

4. Measure furnace gas supply pressure with burners

firing. Supply pressure must be within the range

specified in the “Inlet Gas Supply Pressure” table .

If supply pressure differs from the table, make necessary

adjustments to pressure regulator, gas piping size, etc.,

and/or consult with local gas utility.

5. Turn OFF gas to furnace at the manual shutoff valve

and disconnect manometer. Reinstall plug before

turning on gas to furnace.

6. Turn OFF any unnecessary gas appliances started in

step 3.

 

Measure and Adjust Gas Manifold Pressure

 

 

CAUTION

 

To prevent unreliable operation or equipment

damage, the gas manifold pressure must be as

specified on the unit rating plate. Only minor

adjustments should be made by adjusting the gas

valve pressure regulator.

 

Only small variations in gas pressure should be made by

adjusting the gas valve pressure regulator. The manifold

pressure must be measured with the burners operating.

To measure and adjust the manifold pressure, use the

following procedure.

1. Turn OFF gas to furnace at the manual gas shutoff

valve external to the furnace.

2. Connect a calibrated water manometer (or appropri-

ate gas pressure gauge) at the gas valve outlet pres-

sure tap (refer to gas valve figure in previous

section).

3. Turn ON the gas supply and operate the furnace.

4. Measure gas manifold pressure with burners firing.

Adjust manifold pressure using the table below.

Manifold Gas Pressure

 

Drip Leg Cap

With Fitting

 

Gas

 

Range

 

Nominal

 

 

Manometer Hose

 

Natural Low Stage 1.6 – 2.2″ w.c.

High Stage 3.0 – 3.6″ w.c.

Propane Low Stage 5.7 – 6.3″ w.c.

 

1.9″ w.c.

3.5″ w.c.

6.0″ w.c.

 

 

Manometer

Measuring Inlet Gas Pressure

(Alternate Method)

3. Turn ON the gas supply and operate the furnace and

all other gas consuming appliances on the same gas

supply line.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

 

High Stage 9.7 – 10.3″ w.c. 10.0″ w.c.

The final manifold pressure must not vary more

than ± 0.3 “ w.c. from the above specified pressures. Any

necessary major changes in gas flow rate should be made

by changing the size of the burner orifice.

the regulator cap.

 

Startup Adjustments and Measurements

 

 

6. Turn the adjustment screw clockwise to increase the

pressure, or counterclockwise to decrease the pres-

sure.

7. Securely replace the regulator cap.

8. Turn OFF gas to furnace at the manual shutoff valve

and disconnect manometer.

9. Reinstall gas valve outlet pressure tap plug before

turning on gas to furnace.

 

Measure Natural Gas Input Rate

 

 

NOTE: The gas input rate to the furnace must never be

greater than that specified on the unit rating plate.

Use the following procedure to measure natural gas input

using the gas meter:

1. Turn OFF the gas supply to all other gas-burning ap-

pliances except the furnace.

2. While the furnace is operating, time and record one

complete revolution of the smallest gas meter dial.

3. Calculate the number of seconds per cubic foot (sec/

ft3) of gas being delivered to the furnace. If the dial is

a one cubic foot dial, divide the number of seconds

recorded in step 2 by one. If the dial is a two cubic

foot dial, divide the number of seconds recorded in

step 2 by two.

4. Calculate the furnace input in BTUs per hour (BTU/

hr). Input equals the sum of the installation’s gas

heating value and a conversion factor (hours to sec-

onds) divided by the number of seconds per cubic

foot. The measured input must not be greater than

the input indicated on the unit rating plate.

 

Installation’s gas heating (HTG) value: 1,000 BTU/ft3

(Obtained from gas supplier)

Installation’s seconds per cubic foot: 34 sec/ ft3

Conversion Factor (hours to seconds): 3600 sec/hr

Input = (Htg. value x 3600) ÷ seconds per cubic foot

Input = (1,000 BTU/ft3 x 3600 sec/hr) ÷ 34 sec/ ft3

Input = 106,000 BTU/hr

5. Repeat steps 1 through 3 on high stage (2nd stage).

 

NOTE: The final manifold pressure cannot vary by

more than ± 0.3” w.c. from the specified setting. Consult

your local gas supplier if additional input rate adjustment

is required.

 

6. Turn ON gas to and relight all other appliances

turned off in step 1. Be certain that all appliances

are functioning properly and that all pilot burners are

operating.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

28

 

 

Measure and Adjust Temperature Rise

 

Air temperature rise is the temperature difference between

supply and return air. Temperature rise must be within the

range specified on the unit rating plate. An incorrect tem-

perature rise could cause condensing in or overheating of

the heat exchanger. An airflow and temperature rise table

is provided in the specification sheet. Determine and

adjust temperature rise as follows:

1. Operate furnace with burners firing for approximately

ten minutes. Ensure all registers are open and all

duct dampers are in their final (fully or partially open)

position.

2. Place thermometers in the return and supply ducts

as close to the furnace as possible. Thermometers

must not be influenced by radiant heat by being able

to “see” the heat exchanger.

3. Subtract the return air temperature from the supply

air temperature to determine the air temperature rise.

Allow adequate time for thermometer readings to

stabilize.

4. Adjust temperature rise by adjusting the circulator

blower speed. Increase blower speed to reduce tem-

perature rise. Decrease blower speed to increase

temperature rise. Refer to Adjust Circulator Blower

Speeds for speed changing details.

HEAT EXCHANGER

RADIATION “LINE OF SIGHT”

 

SUPPLY

AIR

TSUPPLY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RISE = TSUPPLY – TRETURN

 

 

TRETURN

 

 

RETURN

AIR

 

 

Temperature Rise Measurement

 

Startup Procedure and Adjustment

 

 

Adjust Circulator Blower Speeds

 

 

WARNING

 

To avoid death or personal injury due to electrical

shock, turn off power to the furnace before changing

speed taps.

 

All furnaces are shipped with heating speed set at “B” and

cooling speed set at “D”. Use the following procedure to

select the heating and cooling speed needed for your unit.

Use the CFM LED (green), adjacent to the integrated

control module fuse to verify airflow quantity. The green

CFM LED blinks once for each 100 CFM of airflow.

1. Determine the tonnage of the cooling system installed

with the furnace. If the cooling capacity is in BTU/hr

divide it by 12,000 to convert capacity to TONs.

Example:Cooling Capacity of 30,000 BTU/hr.

30,000/12,000 = 2.5 Tons

2. Determine the proper air flow for the cooling system.

Most cooling systems are designed to work with air

flows between 350 and 450 CFM per ton. Most manu-

facturers recommend an air flow of about 400 CFM per

ton.

Example: 2.5 tons X 400 CFM per ton = 1000 CFM

The cooling system manufacturer’s instructions must be

checked for required air flow. Any electronic air cleaners

or other devices may require specific air flows, consult

installation instructions of those devices for requirements.

3. Knowing the furnace model, locate the high stage

cooling air flow charts in the specification sheet. Look

up the cooling air flow determined in step 2 and find the

required cooling speed and adjustment setting.

Example: A 70 kBtu furnace is to be installed with a

2.5 ton air conditioning system. The air

flow needed is 1000 CFM. Using the cool-

ing speed chart for the 70 kBtu furnace,

find the airflow closest to 1000 CFM. A

cooling airflow of 990 CFM can be at-

tained by setting the cooling speed to “C”

and the adjustment to “-” (minus).

NOTE: Continuous Fan Speed will be

56% of high stage cooling.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

29

 

 

4. Locate the blower speed selection DIP switches on the

integrated control module. Select the desired “cool-

ing” speed tap by positioning switches 1 and 2 appro-

priately. Select the desired “adjust” tap by positioning

switches 3 and 4 appropriately. Refer to the following

figure for switch positions and their corresponding

taps. Turn off power to furnace for a minimum of 10

seconds, allowing motor to reset and recognize new

speed selection. Turn on power to furnace. Verify

CFM by counting the number of times the green CFM

LED blinks.

5. Select the heating speed from the heating speed chart

in the specification sheet for your model. The adjust

setting (already established by the cooling speed

selection) determines which set of speeds are avail-

able. The selected speed must provide a temperature

rise within the rise range listed with the particular

model.

Example: The 70 kBtu is set for 990 CFM on cooling,

the “ADJUST” is set to “-” (minus). The

four heating speeds available are “A Mi-

nus”, “B Minus”, “C Minus”, and “D Minus”.

“B Minus” has a rise of 56°F for both

stages which is within the 30-60°F rise

range for the 70 kBtu. This setting will

keep electrical consumption to a mini-

mum. Set the “Heat” speed DIP switches

to “A”.

6. Select the desired “heating” speed tap by positioning

switches 7 and 8 appropriately. Refer to figure above.

Turn off power to furnace for a minimum of 10 seconds,

allowing motor to reset and recognize new speed

selection. Turn on power to furnace. Verify selected

CFM by counting the green CFM LED blinks.

In general lower heating speeds will: reduce electrical

consumption, lower operating sound levels of the blower,

and increase the outlet air temperature delivered to the

home. The speeds available allow the blower perfor-

mance to be optimized for the particular homeowner’s

needs.

 

Startup Procedure and Adjustment

 

 

 

 

Cooling

Speed

Tap A

 

 

Cooling

Speed

Tap B

 

 

Cooling

Speed

Tap C

 

 

 

8 7 4 3 2 1

 

O O

F F

F F

8 7 4 3 2 1

 

O O

F N

F

8 7 4 3 2 1

 

O O

N F

F

8 7 4 3 2 1

 

 

 

 

Normal*

 

 

 

+ (Plus)

Adjust

 

 

 

- (Minus)

Adjust

 

 

 

8 7 4 3 2 1

 

O O

F F

F F

8 7 4 3 2 1

 

O O

F N

F

8 7 4 3 2 1

 

O O

N F

F

 

 

 

Adjust Blower Heat Off Delay

 

The integrated control module provides a selectable heat

off delay function. The heat off delay period may be set to

60, 90, 120, 180 seconds using the DIP switches or jumper

provided on the control module. The delay is factory

shipped at 90 seconds but may be changed to suit the

installation requirements and/or homeowner preference.

Refer to the following figures for switch positions and

corresponding delay times.

 

3 Heat Off

Delay

 

Cooling

Speed

Tap D

 

*

 

 

O O

N N

 

Adjust Taps

(* indicates factory setting)

 

8 7 4 3 2 1

 

ON

ON

 

 

ON

 

2

1

 

3

2

 

 

 

Heat Off *

Delay

 

Cooling Speed Taps

(* indicates factory setting)

 

Heating

Speed

Tap A

 

 

Heating *

Speed

Tap B

 

 

Heating

Speed

Tap C

 

 

O O

F F

F F

8 7 4 3 2 1

 

O O

F N

F

8 7 4 3 2 1

 

OFF

 

 

OFF

ON

 

 

OFF

OFF

 

1

 

3

2

1

 

3

2

1

 

90 Seconds

 

Heat Off

Delay

120 Seconds

 

Heat Off

Delay

180 Seconds

 

 

 

Heating

Speed

Tap D

 

O O

N F

F

8 7 4 3 2 1

 

O O

N N

 

Heat Off Delay

(* indicates factory setting)

 

Heat Off Delay Switches

 

 

Heating Speed Taps

(* indicates factory setting)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30

 

Normal Sequence of Operation

 

Power Up

 

The normal power up sequence is as follows:

• 115 VAC power applied to furnace.

• Integrated control module performs internal checks.

• Integrated control module flashes LED one time.

• Integrated control module monitors safety circuits continuously.

• Furnace awaits call from thermostat.

 

 

Heating Mode

 

The normal operational sequence in heating mode is as follows:

 

 

• R and W1 (or R and W1/W2) thermostat contacts

close, initiating a call for heat.

• Integrated control module performs safety circuit

checks.

• Induced draft blower is energized on high speed for a

10-second prepurge. Humidifier terminals are ener-

gized with induced draft blower.

• Induced draft blower steps to low speed following

prepurge. Low stage pressure switch contacts are

closed.

• Igniter warm up begins upon step to low speed and

presence of closed low stage pressure switch con-

tacts.

• Gas valve opens at end of igniter warm up period,

delivering gas to burners and establishing flame.

• Integrated control module monitors flame presence.

Gas valve will remain open only if flame is sensed.

• If the thermostat call is for low heat, gas valve and

induced draft blower will continue on low stage. If the

call is for high heat, the gas valve and induced draft

blower will change to high stage.

• Circulator blower is energized on the appropriate heat

speed following a fixed thirty second blower on delay.

The circulator blower requires 30 seconds to ramp up

to full speed. Electronic air cleaner terminals are

energized with circulator blower.

• Furnace is now operating on the specified stage called

for by the two-stage thermostat.

• Furnace runs, integrated control module monitors safety

circuits continuously.

• If the two-stage thermostat changes the call from low

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31

 

 

heat to high heat, the integrated control module will

immediately switch the induced draft blower, gas valve,

and circulator blower to their high stage settings.

• If the two-stage thermostat changes the call from high

heat to low heat, the control will immediately switch the

induced draft blower and gas valve to their low stage

settings. The circulator blower will remain on high

heating speed for thirty seconds before switching to

the low heat circulating speed.

• R and W1 (or R and W1/W2) thermostat contacts

open, completing the call for heat.

• Gas valve closes, extinguishing flame.

• Induced draft blower is de-energized following a fifteen

second post purge. Humidifier terminals are de-ener-

gized.

• Circulator blower continues running for the selected

heat off delay period (60, 90, 120, or 180 seconds).

The speed run during this period depends on the last

heat call provided by the thermostat.

If the last call for heat was a call for low heat, the air

circulator motor will run on low heat speed for the

duration of the heat off delay period (60, 90, 120, or 180

seconds).

If the last call for heat was a call for high heat, the air

circulating motor will run on the high heating speed for

thirty seconds and then switch to the low heating

speed for the balance of the heat off delay period (30,

60, 90, or 150 seconds).

• Circulator blower and electronic air cleaner terminals

are de-energized

• Circulator blower ramps down to OFF during the 30

seconds following the heat off delay period.

• Furnace awaits next call from thermostat.

 

Normal Sequence of Operation

 

 

 

Cooling Mode

 

The normal operational sequence in cooling mode is as

follows:

• R and YLO/G or Y/G thermostat contacts close, initiat-

ing a call for cool.

• Integrated control module performs safety circuit

checks.

• Outdoor fan and compressor are energized to their

appropriate speed.

• Circulator blower is energized on the appropriate cool

speed following a fixed five second on delay. The

circulator blower requires 30 seconds to ramp up to full

speed. Electronic air cleaner terminals are energized

with circulator blower.

• Furnace circulator blower and outdoor cooling unit run

their appropriate speed, integrated control module

monitors safety circuits continuously.

• R and YLO/G or Y/G thermostat contacts open, com-

pleting the call for cool.

• Outdoor fan and compressor are de-energized.

• Circulator blower continues running for a fixed 45-

second cool off delay period. The speed run during

this period depends on the last cooling call from the

thermostat. If the call was for low cool, the blower will

operate at 88% of low cool speed. If call was for high

cool, blower operate at 88% of high cool speed.

• Electronic air cleaner terminals and circulator blower

are de-energized.

• Furnace awaits next call from thermostat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

32

 

 

 

Fan Only Mode

 

The normal operational sequence in fan only mode is as

follows:

• R and G thermostat contacts close, initiating a call for

fan.

• Integrated control module performs safety circuit

checks.

• Circulator blower is energized on continuous fan speed

(56% of high stage cooling) following a five (5) second

delay. Electronic air cleaner terminals are energized.

• Circulator blower runs, integrated control module moni-

tors safety circuits continuously.

• R and G thermostat contacts open, completing the call

for fan.

• Circulator blower is de-energized. Electronic air cleaner

terminals are de-energized.

• Furnace awaits next call from thermostat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Circulator

Blower

 

Gas Valve

 

 

Igniter

 

 

Pressure

Switches

Induced Draft

Blower

 

Thermostat

(Call for Heat)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High

Low

Off

 

On

Off

 

On

Off

PS2 Closed

PS1 Closed

Open

High

Low

Off

High

Low

Off

 

Timing Charts For Normal Heating Operation

 

 

Example 1: Continuous Call For Low Stage Heat Only

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0 10 30 33 34 64 94 0 15 30 60, 90 90, 120,

 

4-second

maximum trial

for ignition

period

 

Time (sec)

 

120, or 150, or

180 210

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Circulator

Blower

 

Gas Valve

 

 

Igniter

 

 

Pressure

Switches

 

Induced Draft

Blower

 

Thermostat

(Call for Heat)

 

 

 

 

 

 

High

Low

Off

High

Low

Off

 

On

Off

PS2 Closed

PS1 Closed

Open

High

Low

Off

High

Low

Off

 

 

Example 2: Continuous Call For High Stage Heat Only

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0 10 30 33 34 64 94 0 15 30 60, 90 90, 120,

 

4-second

maximum trial

for ignition

period

 

Time (sec)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33

 

120, or 150, or

180 210

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Circulator

Blower

 

Gas Valve

 

 

Igniter

 

 

Pressure

Switches

Induced Draft

Blower

 

Thermostat

(Call For Heat)

 

Timing Charts for Normal Heating Operation

 

 

Example 3: Initial Call For Low Heat, Change In Call To High Heat

 

 

Call Change to High Heat

 

High

Low

Off

High

Low

Off

 

On

Off

PS2 Closed

PS1 Closed

Open

High

Low

Off

High

Low

Off

 

0 10 30 33 34 64 94 0 15 30

Time (sec)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

60, 90 90, 120,

120, or 150, or

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Circulator

Blower

 

Gas Valve

 

 

Igniter

 

 

Pressure

Switches

 

Induced Draft

Blower

 

Thermostat

(Call For Heat)

 

4-second

maximum trial

period

Example 4: Initial Call For High Heat, Subsequent Call To Low Heat

 

Call Change to Low Heat

30 Seconds After Call Change to Low Heat

 

High

Low

Off

High

Low

Off

 

On

Off

PS2 Closed

PS1 Closed

Open

High

Low

Off

High

Low

Off

 

180 210

 

0 10 30 33 34 64 94 0 15

Time (sec)

4-second

maximum trial

for ignition

period

 

 

34

 

60, 90 90, 120,

120, or 150, or

180 210

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Circulator

Blower

 

 

Outdoor Fan

And

Compressor

 

 

 

Thermostat

(Call For Cool)

 

Timing Charts for Normal Cooling Operation

 

Example 1: Continuous Call For Low Stage Cooling Only

 

 

High

Low

Off (88% of Low)

 

 

High

Low

Off

 

 

High

Low

Off

 

0 5 35

 

Time (sec)

 

0

 

45

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Circulator

 

 

 

 

 

Example 2: Continuous Call For High Stage Cooling Only

 

 

 

High

Low

 

Blower

 

 

Outdoor Fan

And

Compressor

 

 

 

Thermostat

(Call For Cool)

 

Off

 

 

High

Low

Off

 

 

High

Low

Off

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0 5 35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time (sec)

 

(88% of High)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0 45

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Circulator

Blower

 

 

 

 

Thermostat

(Call For Fan)

 

 

 

Timing Chart for Normal Fan Operation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On

Off

 

 

 

On

Off

 

0 5

 

 

 

35

 

Time (sec)

 

0

 

Operational Checks

 

These checks establish that the primary limit control is functioning and will respond to a restriction in the return air, or a

circulator blower failure. If the primary limit control does not function during this test, the cause must be determined and

corrected.

 

WARNING

 

To prevent personal injury or death, do not remove any internal compartment covers or attempt any adjustment.

Electrical components are contained in both compartments. Contact a qualified service agent at once if an

abnormal flame appearance should develop.

 

 

WARNING

 

To prevent death, personal injury or property damage due to fire, follow these directions for the auxiliary limit

control. If the auxiliary limit control opens, it may be reset one time only.

 

 

WARNING

 

To prevent death, personal injury, property damage or premature failure of heat exchanger, do not adjust the

primary limit control (factory set).

 

 

 

Burner Flame

 

The burner flames should be inspected with the burner

compartment door installed. A sight glass is provided for

inspection purposes. Flames should be stable, quiet, soft,

and blue (dust may cause orange tips but they must not be

yellow). Flames should extend directly outward from the

burners without curling, floating, or lifting off. Flames must

not impinge on the sides of the heat exchanger firing tubes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check the burner flames for:

1. Good adjustment

2. Stable, soft and blue

3. Not curling, floating, or lifting off.

 

 

Burner Flame

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

36

 

 

 

Auxiliary Limit

 

A manual reset limits are located on or near the blower. To

access this auxiliary limit, disconnect the electrical power

and remove the blower door. If the limit control opens, the

air circulation blower will run continuously. The diagnostic

light will flash four times. These symptoms are identical to

a trip of the primary limit control.

The auxiliary limit control is designed to prevent furnace

operation in case of main blower failure on horizontal

installations. It may also open if the power supply is

interrupted while the furnace is firing.

The auxiliary limit control is suitable for both horizontal right

and horizontal left installations. Regardless of airflow di-

rection, it does not need to be relocated.

(SERVICER’S NOTE: If it becomes necessary to slide the

blower assembly out of the furnace, the auxiliary limit

control should be removed first. After the blower assembly

is reinstalled, the auxiliary limit must be reinstalled.)

 

Operational Checks

 

 

High or Primary Limit

 

The primary limit control guards against overheating re-

sulting from insufficient conditioned air passing over the

heat exchanger. If the primary limit control does not

function during this test, the cause must be determined and

corrected. Function of this control should be verified by

gradually blocking the furnace return air after the furnace

has been operating (burners firing) for approximately 15

minutes. Check the control as follows:

1. Allow the furnace to operate with burners firing con-

tinuously for approximately 15 minutes.

2. Gradually block the return air to furnace. Remove

airflow blockage when limit control is activated and

turns off burners. Airflow blockage causes unit over-

heating and will produce the following reactions:

• The gas valve to close and extinguish flame,

• The induced draft blower to deenergized after a

fifteen second postpurge, and

• The circulator blower to remain energized continu-

ously until limit control resets.

 

 

3. Remove the return air blockage to clear overheating

condition. After an acceptable temperature is

reached during the cool down period, the limit control

will reset and allow the furnace to resume normal op-

eration.

These checks establish that the primary limit control is

functioning and will respond to a restriction in the return air,

or a circulator blower failure. If the primary limit control

does not function during this test, the cause must be

determined and corrected.

Primary Limit Control

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Primary Limit Control

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indoor Fan

 

 

 

Outdoor Fan

And

Compressor

 

 

 

Thermostat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On

Off

 

 

 

On

Off

 

 

 

On

Off

 

Seconds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

37

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0 45

 

Safety Circuit Description

 

A number of safety circuits are employed to ensure safe and proper furnace operation. These circuits serve to control

any potential safety hazards and serve as inputs in the monitoring and diagnosis of abnormal function. These circuits

are continuously monitored during furnace operation by the integrated ignition control.

 

 

Integrated Ignition Control

 

The integrated ignition control is an electronic device

which controls all furnace operations. Responding to the

thermostat, the module initiates and controls normal fur-

nace operation, and monitors and addresses all safety

circuits. If a potential safety concern is detected, the

module will take the necessary precautions and provide

diagnostic information through an LED.

 

Primary Limit

 

The primary limit control is located on the partition panel

and monitors heat exchanger compartment temperatures.

It is a normally-closed (electrically), automatic reset, tem-

perature-activated sensor. The limit guards against the

overheating as a resulting of insufficient conditioned air

passing over the heat exchanger.

 

Auxiliary Limit

 

The auxiliary limit controls are located on or near the

circulator blower and monitors heat exchanger compart-

ment temperatures. They are a normally-closed (electri-

cally), manual-reset, temperature activated sensor. These

limits guard against overheating as a result of insufficient

conditioned air passing over the heat exchanger.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

38

 

 

Rollout Limit

 

The rollout limit controls are mounted on the burner/

manifold assembly and monitor the burner flame. They are

normally-closed (electrically), manual-reset, temperature-

activated sensors. These limits guard against burner

flames not being properly drawn into the heat exchanger.

 

Pressure Switches

 

The pressure switches are normally-open (closed during

operation), single-pole single-throw, negative air pres-

sure-activated switches. They monitor the airflow (com-

bustion air and flue products) through the heat exchanger

via pressure taps located on the induced draft blower and

the coil front cover. These switches guard against insuffi-

cient airflow (combustion air and flue products) through the

heat exchanger and/or blocked condensate drain condi-

tions.

 

Flame Sensor

 

The flame sensor is a probe mounted to the burner/

manifold assembly which uses the principle of flame recti-

fication to determine the presence or absence of flame.

 

Burner Box

 

This furnace must use indoor air for combustion. It is not a

direct vent furnace, and it cannot be installed as a direct

vent furnace. The burner box is present only to reduce the

burner sound transmission.

 

Troubleshooting

 

Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Precautions

 

 

 

NOTE: Discharge body’s static electricity before touching unit. An electrostatic discharge can adversely affect

electrical components.

Use the following precautions during furnace installation and servicing to protect the integrated ignition control from

damage. By putting the furnace, the control, and the person at the same electrostatic potential, these steps will help avoid

exposing the integrated ignition control to electrostatic discharge. This procedure is applicable to both installed and

uninstalled (ungrounded) furnaces.

1. Disconnect all power to the furnace. Do not touch the integrated ignition control or any wire connected to the con-

trol prior to discharging your body’s electrostatic charge to ground.

2. Firmly touch a clean, unpainted, metal surface of the furnaces near the control. Any tools held in a person’s hand

during grounding will be discharged.

3. Service integrated ignition control or connecting wiring following the discharge process in step 2. Use caution not

to recharge your body with static electricity; (i.e., do not move or shuffle your feet, do not touch ungrounded ob-

jects, etc.). If you come in contact with an ungrounded object, repeat step 2 before touching control or wires.

4. Discharge your body to ground before removing a new control from its container. Follow steps 1 through 3 if in-

stalling the control on a furnace. Return any old or new controls to their containers before touching any un-

grounded object.

 

 

 

 

 

Furnace Lockout

 

Furnace lockout results when a furnace is unable to

achieve ignition after three attempts, or when it has lost

flame five times during a single call for heat. It is charac-

terized by a non-functioning furnace and a one flash

diagnostic LED code. If the furnace is in “lockout”, it will (or

can be) reset in any of the following ways.

1. Automatic reset. The integrated ignition control will

automatically reset itself and attempt to resume nor-

mal operations following a two hour lockout period.

2. Manual power interruption. Interrupt 115 volt power

to the furnace for 0 – 30 seconds.

3. Manual thermostat cycle. Lower the thermostat so

that there is no longer a call for heat then reset to

previous setting. Interrupt thermostat signal to the

furnace for 0 – 30 seconds.

 

NOTE: If the condition which originally caused the

lockout still exists, the control will return to lockout.

Refer to Diagnostic Chart section for aid in determining

the cause.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

39

 

 

 

 

 

Diagnostic Chart

 

 

WARNING

 

To avoid electrical shock, injury or death, disconnect

electrical power before performing any service or

maintenance.

 

For assistance in determining the source of unit opera-

tional problems, refer to the troubleshooting chart on the

following pages The red diagnostic LED blinks to assist in

troubleshooting the unit. The number of blinks refers to a

specific fault code.

 

 

 

 

 

Symptoms of Abnormal

Operation

 

 

 

 

 

Associated

LED Code2

 

Troubleshooting Chart

 

 

Fault Description(s) Possible Causes

 

 

 

 

 

Corrective Action

 

 

 

 

 

Cautions and Notes

 

• Furnace fails to operate.

• Integrated control module

diagnostic LED provides

no signal.

 

NONE

 

• No 115 volt power to

furnace, or no 24 volt

power to integrated

control module.

• Blown fuse or circuit

breaker.

 

• Manual disconnect switch

OFF, door switch open, or

24 volt wires improperly

connected or loose.

• Blown fuse or circuit

breaker.

 

• Assure 115 and 24 volt

power to furnace

integrated control module.

• Check integrated control

module fuse (3A).

Replace if necessary.

• Check for possible shorts

 

• Turn power OFF prior

to repair.

 

• Replace integrated

control module fuse

with 3A automotive

fuse.

 

• No signal from

 

in 115 and 24 volt circuits. • Improper thermostat

 

 

 

 

• Furnace fails to operate.

• Integrated control module

diagnostic LED is lit

continuously.

 

 

• Furnace fails to operate.

• Integrated control module

diagnostic LED is

flashing ONE (1) flash.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

• Furnace fails to operate.

• Integrated control module

diagnostic LED is

flashing TWO (2) flashes.

 

 

 

 

 

ON

 

CONTINUOUS

ON

 

 

1

 

 

1 FLASH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

2 FLASHES

 

thermostat.

 

 

• Integrated control

module has an

internal fault.

 

 

 

• Furnace lockout due

to an excessive

number of ignition

“retries” (3 total) or

“recycles (5 total)1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

• Pressure switch

circuit is closed.

• Induced draft

blower is not

operating.

 

• Improper thermostat

connection or setting.

 

• Integrated control module

has an internal fault.

 

 

 

 

• Failure to establish flame.

Cause may be no gas to

burners, front cover

pressure switch stuck open,

bad igniter or igniter

alignment, improper orifices,

or coated/oxidized or

improperly connected flame

sensor.

 

• Loss of flame after establish-

ment. Cause may be

interrupted gas supply, lazy

burner flames (improper gas

pressure or restriction in flue

and/or combustion air

piping), front cover pressure

switch opening, or improper

induced draft blower

performance.

• Induced draft blower

pressure switch contacts

sticking.

• Shorts in pressure switch

circuit.

 

Repair as necessary.

 

 

• Replace bad integrated

control module.

 

 

 

 

• Locate and correct gas

interruption.

• Check front cover

pressure switch

operation (hose, wiring,

contact operation).

Correct if necessary.

• Replace or realign

igniter.

• Check flame sense

signal. Sand sensor if

coated and/or oxidized.

• Check flue piping for

blockage, proper

length, elbows, and

termination.

• Verify proper induced

draft blower perfor-

mance.

• Replace induced draft

blower pressure switch.

• Repair short.

 

connection or setting.

 

 

• Turn power OFF prior

to repair.

• Read precautions in

“Electrostatic Dis-

charge” section of

manual.

 

 

 

 

• Turn power OFF prior

to repair.

 

 

 

 

• Igniter is fragile, handle

with care.

• Sand flame sensor with

emery cloth.

• See “Vent/Flue Pipe”

section for piping

details.

 

• Induced draft blower

 

• Low stage pressure • Pressure switch hose

 

• Inspect pressure

 

cycles ON for one minute

and OFF for three

minutes with no further

furnace operation.

• Integrated control module

diagnostic LED is

flashing THREE (3)

flashes.

 

3

 

 

3 FLASHES

 

switch circuit does

not close in

response to

induced draft

blower operation.

 

blocked, pinched or

connected improperly.

• Blocked flue and/or inlet air

pipe, blocked drain system,

or weak induced draft

blower.

• Incorrect low stage pressure

switch setpoint or malfunc-

tioning switch contacts.

• Loose or improperly

connected wiring.

 

switch hose. Repair, if

necessary,

• Inspect flue and/or inlet

air piping for blockage,

proper length, elbows,

and termination. Check

drain system. Correct

as necessary.

• Correct low stage

pressure switch

setpoint or contact

motion.

• Tighten or correct

wiring connection.

 

 

• Turn power OFF prior

to repair.

• Replace pressure

switch with proper

replacement part.

 

 

• Turn power OFF prior

to repair.

• Replace pressure

switch with proper

replacement part.

 

 

1Integrated control module will automatically attempt to reset from lockout after one hour.

 

 

 

 

 

40

 

 

 

 

 

Symptoms of Abnormal

Operation

• Circulator blower runs

continuously. No furnace

operation.

• Integrated control module

diagnostic LED is flashing

FOUR (4) flashes.

 

 

 

 

Associated

LED Code2

 

4

 

 

4 FLASHES

 

Troubleshooting Chart

 

 

Fault Description(s) Possible Causes

 

• Primary or auxiliary • Insufficient conditioned air

limit circuit is open. over the heat exchanger.

Blocked filters, restrictive

ductwork, improper

circulator blower speed, or

failed circulator blower.

 

• Flame rollout.

• Misaligned burners, blocked

 

 

 

 

 

Corrective Action

 

• Check filters and ductwork

for blockage. Clean filters

or remove obstruction.

• Check circulator blower

speed and performance.

Correct speed or replace

blower if necessary.

• Check burners for proper

alignment.

 

 

 

 

 

Cautions and Notes

 

• Turn power OFF

prior to repair.

• See Specification

Sheet for

allowable rise

range and proper

circulator speed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

• Furnace fails to operate.

• Integrated control module

diagnostic LED is flashing

SIX (6) flashes.

 

 

 

 

• Induced draft blower runs

continuously. No furnace

operation.

• Integrated control module

diagnostic LED is flashing

SEVEN (7) flashes.

 

 

 

 

 

• Furnace not operating.

• Integrated control module

diagnostic LED is flashing

EIGHT (8) flashes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

 

6 FLASHES

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

7 FLASHES

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

8 FLASHES

 

• Rollout limit circuit is

open.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

• Polarity of 115 volt

power is reversed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

• Flame sense

microamp signal is

low.

 

 

 

 

 

• Problem with igniter

circuit.

 

flue and/or air inlet pipe, or

failed induced draft blower.

• Loose or improperly

connected wiring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

• Polarity of 115 volt AC

power to furnace or

integrated control module is

reversed.

• Poor unit ground.

 

 

 

• Flame sensor is coated/

oxidized.

• Flame sensor incorrectly

positioned in burner flame.

• Lazy burner flame due to

improper gas pressure or

combustion air.

 

 

 

 

• Improperly connected

igniter

 

• Bad igniter

• Poor unit ground

 

• Check flue and air inlet

piping for blockage,

proper length, elbows,

and termination. Correct

as necessary.

• Check induced draft

blower for proper

performance. Replace, if

necessary.

• Tighten or correct wiring

connection.

• Review wiring diagram to

correct polarity.

 

• Verify proper ground.

Correct if necessary.

• Check and correct wiring.

 

• Sand flame sensor is

coated/oxidized.

• Inspect for proper sensor

alignment.

• Check inlet air piping for

blockage, proper length,

elbows, and termination.

• Compare current gas

pressure to rating plate

info. Adjust as needed.

 

 

• Check and correct wiring

from integrated control

module to igniter

• Replace bad igniter

• Check and correct unit

ground wiring

 

• See “Vent/Flue

Pipe” section for

piping details.

 

 

• Replace pressure

switch with proper

replacement part.

 

 

 

• Turn power OFF

prior to repair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

• Turn power OFF

prior to repair.

• Sand flame

sensor with emery

clot.

• See “Vent/Flue

Pipe” section for

piping details.

• See rating plate

for proper gas

pressure.

• Turn power OFF

prior to repair.

• Replace igniter

with proper silicon

nitride replace-

ment part.

 

• Furnace operating on

low stage gas with high

 

 

 

9

 

 

• High stage pressure

 

• Pressure switch hose blocked, • Inspectpressure switch hose. • Turn power OFF

pinched or connected Repair, if necessary. prior to repair.

 

stage induced draft blower

• High stage circulator

blower (temperature, of

conditioned air, lower than

typical).

• Integrated control module

diagnostic LED is flashing

 

C

 

 

9 FLASHES

 

switch circuit does not

close in response to

high stage induced

draft blower operation.

 

improperly.

• Blocked flue and/or inlet air

pipe, blocked drain system, or

weak induced draft blower.

• Incorrect pressure switch

setpoint or malfunctioning

switch contacts.

 

• Inspect flue and/or inlet air

piping for blockage, proper

length, elbows, and termina-

tion. Check drain system.

Correctas necessary.

• Correct pressure switch

setpoint or contact motion.

 

• Replace pressure

switch with proper

replacement part.

 

NINE (9) flashes.

 

• Induced draft blower runs

continuously. No furnace

operation.

• Integrated control module

diagnostic LED is flashing

continuously.

 

 

 

 

C

 

CONTINUOUS

ON

 

 

 

• Flame sensed with

no call for heat.

 

• Loose or improperly connected • Tighten or correct wiring

wiring. connection.

• Short to ground in flame • Correct short at flame

sense circuit. sensor or in flame

sensor wiring.

• Lingering burner flame. • Check for lingering

flame

 

 

 

• Turn power OFF

prior to repair.

 

• Slow closing gas valve

 

41

 

• Verify proper operation

of gas valve

 

Maintenance

 

 

WARNING

 

To avoid electrical shock, injury or death, disconnect electrical power before performing any maintenance.

 

If you must handle the igniter, handle with care. Touching the igniter element with bare fingers, rough handling, or

vibration could damage the igniter resulting in premature failure. Only a qualified servicer should ever handle the

igniter.

The furnace should be inspected by a qualified installer, or service agency at least once per year. This check should be

performed at the beginning of the heating season. This will ensure that all furnace components are in proper working order

and that the heating system functions appropriately. Pay particular attention to the following items. Repair or service as

necessary.

• Flue pipe system. Check for blockage and/or leakage. Check the outside termination and the connections at and

internal to the furnace.

• Heat exchanger. Check for corrosion and/or buildup within the heat exchanger passageways.

• Burners. Check for proper ignition, burner flame, and flame sense.

• Wiring. Check electrical connections for tightness and/or corrosion. Check wires for damage.

• Filters.

Filters

 

 

WARNING

 

To prevent death, personal injury or property damage due to fire, never operate furnace without a filter installed.

Dust and lint will build up on internal parts resulting in loss of efficiency, equipment damage and possible fire.

 

 

CAUTION

 

To ensure proper unit performance, adhere to the filter sizes given in the Specifications Sheet.

 

Improper filter maintenance is the most common cause of inadequate heating or cooling performance. Filters

should be cleaned (permanent) or replaced (disposable) every two months or as required. When replacing a

filter, it must be replaced with a filter of the same type and size.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42

 

 

 

 

FILTER REMOVAL

 

Maintenance

 

Depending on the installation, differing filter arrangements

can be applied. Filters can be installed in the central return

register, the bottom of the blower compartment, or a side

panel external filter rack kit. A media air filter or electronic

air cleaner can be used as an alternate filter. The filter

sizes given in the Specifications Sheet must be followed to

ensure proper unit performance. Refer to the following for

removal and installation of filters.

To remove a filter from the bottom of the blower compart-

ment:

1. Turn OFF electrical power to furnace.

2. Remove blower compartment door.

3. Push back and up on the wire filter retainer to release

it from under the front lip of the furnace basepan.

4. Slide filter forward and out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Front of Furnace

 

 

 

Blower

 

 

 

 

Grab Here

And Lift

 

 

 

 

 

 

Front of Furnace

 

 

 

Blower

 

5. Replace filter by reversing the procedure for removal.

To remove internal filter(s) from the retaining rails on the

side(s) of the blower compartment in an upright installa-

 

a. Lift filter above bottom b. Tilt filter to clear rail.

rail

 

tion:

1. Turn OFF electrical power to furnace.

2. Remove the blower compartment door.

3. Grasp the lower portion of the filter and lift up.

4. Angle the filter towards the blower until the filter is clear

of the bottom rail.

5. Lower the filter down and pull outward.

6. Replace the filter by reversing the procedure for re-

moval.

To remove filters from an external filter rack in an upright

installation, follow the directions provided with external

 

Front of Furnace

 

 

 

Blower

 

Front of Furnace

 

 

 

Blower

 

filter rack kit.

Using a vacuum cleaner, clean out the blower area, exter-

nal filter rack area, and the adjacent area of the return air

duct.

Clean, wash and dry a permanent filter. When using a

metal filter, both sides should be sprayed with a dust

adhesive as recommended on adhesive container. Spray

adhesives for use with permanent metal filters can be

found at some hardware stores. BE SURE AIRFLOW

DIRECTION ARROW POINTS TOWARDS THE BLOWER.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

43

 

c. Lower filter below top d. Pull filter out.

rail.

Filter Removal Procedure

 

 

 

 

Burners

 

Maintenance

 

FLUE PASSAGES

Inspect the heat exchanger flue passageways at the be-

 

Visually inspect the burner flames periodically during the

heating season. Turn on the furnace at the thermostat and

allow several minutes for flames to stabilize, since any

dislodged dust will alter the flames normal appearance.

Flames should be stable, quiet, soft, and blue (dust may

cause orange tips but they must not be yellow). They

should extend directly outward from the burners without

curling, floating, or lifting off. Flames must not impinge on

the sides of the heat exchanger firing tubes.

 

Induced Draft and Circulator Blowers

 

The bearings in the induced draft blower and circulator

blower motors are permanently lubricated by the manufac-

turer. No further lubrication is required. Check motor

windings for accumulation of dust which may cause over-

heating. Clean as necessary.

Qualified Servicer Only

 

CONDENSATE TRAP AND DRAIN SYSTEM

Annually inspect the drain tubes, drain trap, and field-

supplied drain line for proper condensate drainage. Check

drain system for hose connection tightness, blockage, and

leaks. Clean or repair as necessary.

FLAME SENSOR

Under some conditions, the fuel or air supply can create a

nearly invisible coating on the flame sensor. This coating

acts as an insulator causing a drop in the flame sense

signal. If the flame sense signal drops too low the furnace

will not sense flame and will lock out. The flame sensor

should be carefully cleaned by a qualified servicer using

emery cloth or steel wool. Following cleaning, the flame

sense signal should be as indicated in the Specifications

Sheet.

IGNITER

If the igniter and the surrounding air are at about 70°F and

the igniter wires are not connected to any other electrical

components, the resistance of the igniter should not

exceed 200 ohms. If it does, the igniter should be replaced.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

44

 

ginning of each heating season. If it is necessary to clean

them, follow the steps outlined below.

1. Turn OFF the electrical power and gas supply to the

furnace.

2. Remove burner assembly by disconnecting the gas

line and removing the manifold brackets from the

partition panel.

3. Remove the flue from the induced draft blower and

the collector box from the partition panel.

4. The primary heat exchanger tubes can be cleaned

using a round wire brush attached to a length of high

grade stainless steel cable, such as drain cleanout

cable. Attach a variable speed reversible drill to the

other end of the spring cable. Slowly rotate the cable

with the drill and insert it into one of the primary heat

exchanger tubes. While reversing the drill, work the

cable in and out several times to obtain sufficient

cleaning. Use a large cable for the large tube, and

then repeat the operation with a small cable for the

smaller tube. Repeat for each tube.

5. When all heat exchanger tubes have been cleaned,

replace the parts in the reverse order in which they

were removed.

6. To reduce the chances of repeated fouling of the

heat exchanger, perform the steps listed in Startup

Adjustments and Measurements.

BURNER CLEANING

1. Shut off electric power and gas supply to the fur-

nace.

2. Remove screws securing manifold to burner bracket.

Slightly pull manifold out and away from burner

bracket. Burners will drop. Re-secure manifold to

burner bracket.

3. Tilt burners to slotted side of burner bracket. Rotate

burners clockwise to remove.

4. Use bottle brush to clean burner insert and inside of

burner.

5. Replace burner (opposite of removal). Ensure burn-

ers are fully seated on burner bracket tabs and are

properly aligned.

6. Turn on electric power and gas supply to the fur-

nace.

7. Check furnace for proper operation. Refer to “Op-

erational Checks” section to verify burner flame char-

acteristics.

 

Before Leaving an Installation

• Cycle the furnace with the thermostat at least three times. Verify cooling and fan only operation.

• Review the Owner’s Manual with the homeowner and discuss proper furnace operation and maintenance.

• Leave literature packet near furnace.

 

 

 

 

 

Repair and Replacement Parts

 

• When ordering any of the listed functional parts, be sure to provide the furnace model, manufacturing, and serial

numbers with the order.

• Although only functional parts are shown in the parts list, all sheet metal parts, doors, etc. may be ordered by

description.

 

 

 

 

 

FUNCTIONAL PARTS LIST-

 

Two-Stage Gas Valve

Natural Gas Orifice

Propane Gas Orifice

Burner

Hot Surface Igniter

Flame Sensor

Gas Manifold

Ignition Control

 

Blower/Box Gasket

Rollout Limit Switch

Auxiliary Limit Switch

Heat Exchanger

Door Switch

Transformer

Blower Wheel

Blower Housing

 

Blower Mounting Bracket Blower Cutoff

 

Pressure Switch

Pressure Switch Hose

Induced Draft Blower

Collector Box

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

®

 

Blower Motor

Motor Mount Bracket

Capacitor

 

is a trademark of Maytag World-

wide N.V. and is used under license to Goodman

Company, L.P. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

45

 


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